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  1. #21

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    If you are doing only one or two sheets at a time, you can develop them in a 120 tank - either singly by bending the sheet emulsion side in, or multiple sheets by slipping an elastic band around the sheet (so called taco method). I used this method when I began, and it works fine.

    For most plastic tanks, you need the centre column in if you want the tank to be light tight.

    I've since gotten hold of a Paterson Orbital, which is sort of like a tray with a lid on, so can be used for daylight developing. It can do four 4x5" sheets, two 5x7" or one 8x10. Very easy to load, and uses a minimal amount of chemistry. No problems with scratches or uneven development.

  2. #22

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    My experience to date:

    Jobo 3010 and 2553 (2551 is the same tank, different lid) tank with 2509 reel. Either one riding on a Beseler or Uniroller motor base. The 2553 also accepts 35mm and 120/220 reels. I assembled all of this for decent prices.

    My opinion of the 3010: One of the best pieces of hardware I own. Possibly worth more than it costs. Ditto for the 2551/2553 twins.

    The Jobo 2551/2553 tanks are the only ones that are long enough to span the rollers on the Uniroller & Beseler bases.

    Places to shop: craigslist, Glazier's, here at APUG, Large Format Photography Forum. Sign up now at the LFPF becasue you have to be a member for 30 days before you can use the For Sale listings. It's a great forum for big camera using folks. You will like it.

  3. #23

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    Thanks for those suggestions, Venchka!

  4. #24
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Wanted adverts here on APUG usually work so give it a try, when I wanted a 5x4 tank I was offered exactly what I was after another 2000 series Jobo with two reels. Last advert has been less successful

    Ian

  5. #25

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    Terri,

    I'm sorry. I thought you were in Seattle. Glazier's is a good LF camera store in Seattle. If you are near any real camera stores, they may have used stuff. I have found several Jobo items and my Uniroller at Houston Camera Co-op. You may have a similar shop near you. Want To Buy works too!

  6. #26

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    No sir; I'm in Atlanta. "Real camera stores" are few & far between. (sigh)

  7. #27

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    Forums and craigslist are your friends.

  8. #28

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    Feb 2004
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    Terri,
    You now know the dirty secret of LF photography. There are more ways to process film than there are different mechanisms to flush toilets in Germany (over 25 million at last count).

    I have used most of them except the 3000 series (There are too many other ways that work to spend that kind of money). My favorite for 4x5 is nylon window screen sewn into a 5 1/2 inch long tube. I cut the screen 5x 5 1/2 inches then sewed a 1/4 seam up the 5" side after folding it over. The film slips into the tube emulsion side in and is placed in a Patterson Series 4 plastic tank on end. Get 5 sheets of 4x5 film in there. Develop just like roll film (inversion method according to developer). Perfect results every time. I develop my 3x4 and 2x3 film the same way in hard plastic tubes that allow developer to get behind the film and wash off the anti-halation coating. Larger films, 5x7 and 8x10 get done in a Unicolor drum on a roller.
    I have used BTZS and 2509 reels, as well as many hours in a darkroom doing tray processing. They all work after you tame the process but they all have a weakness of some type. Only you will find out what best works for you. I don't think jumping to a 3000 series tank is always the best idea.

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  9. #29

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    On the surface, the 3010 seems expensive. It is expensive. As much or more than most lenses. However, it takes all the worry out of developing 4x5 film. What are your latent images worth? The 3010 is cheap insurance for perfect negatives and postives. The 2551/2553 tank and reels is a close second at 1/10 the cost or less. The 2551/2553 has the advantage of taking 3 formats. That's a real plus too.

  10. #30
    keith1phx's Avatar
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    I am just learning the ropes on developing 4x5 as well. I want to make a suggestion or two based on my experience. You may want to use latex gloves (or other material) when using the tray method. Also, be sure that you know exactly where your chemicals are (maybe a little separation of the trays if you have room. I made the mistake of not having enough room and wound up attempting development in stop (for 9 minutes), needless to say nothing developed and I had yellow fingers for several days. I said several bad words when I turned the light on.......................
    Novice mistakes, ain't it fun!
    Someone once said to me; There are two ways to make photographs, your way and the wrong way. Therefore I make photographs that plese me and if someone else finds them pleasing, super.

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