Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,928   Posts: 1,585,179   Online: 760
      
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 43
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    SE USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    342
    Images
    9

    4x5 developing options - opinions?

    Guys: I am brand new to LF and could use some suggestions about 4x5 development.

    I've been shooting MF and 35 for a number of years and have a home darkroom. When I bought an enlarger, I was thinking to stick with what I used in class (the good old reliable Beseler 23 C) but my forward-thinking husband advised me to "think LF" and I ended up with an Omega D5 XL that I picked up for a song from a pro lab that was scaling back. It's done the job for smaller formats. At Christmas, I was shocked to open a Tachihara which I'd been saying was probably the one for me (being somewhat of a girlie-girl, weight has been a major concern). And yes, my husband rules!

    Weather has finally cooperated enough for me to go shoot some tests and I am starting out with tray development, since it's what I have at the ready. But I would like to explore other developing options. I've done some lurking and searching on here and there seems to be high praise for the Jobo 3000 series. I guess my questions are basic: does the apparent ease of use make the price worthwhile? Are there comparable setups that are a bit less expensive? I'm not rich, but price isn't too big an obstacle since the aim is to get consistency in development. I'm a big fumble-fingers at the moment, but I'm pretty smitten with the camera and will use it a lot.

    Could use some feedback! Thanks in advance.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    560
    I use a Jobo 2500 tank with the 2509 reel. Quite a bit of a cheaper setup than the 3000 or Expert Drum series, and if you have a Jobo CPE-2 you can't use that series anyways (need a CPP or better). The downside is the 2509 is kind of a pain to load. BTZS (Beyond the Zone System) tubes, either bought at the View Camera Store or home-built, also seem to be a good option, but they require you load them and pour in developer in total darkness, so a bit harder to use.

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,435
    Images
    148
    The Jobo 2000 & 3000 series are well worth the money. I've had my first 2000 series tank since 1976 and it's processed 100's of5x4 negs. I bought a second via APUG 3 years ago so have one in Turkey the other in the UK.

    Ian

  4. #4
    Lee L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,244
    If you're going for the 2500 series tanks and reels, be sure to get the 2509N (not just the 2509) reel. The 2509N has snap in tabs that break up developer flow which can cause uneven development on the plain 2509 reel. Experiences vary, but I had very poor results from a plain 2509 reel. There is a reason the 3000 series tanks were introduced; more consistently even development, and I'd recommend them over the 2500 series, even at the higher price for tanks and a compatible processor.

    I currently use trays and a Summitek Cradle, discontinued, but essentially the same as this: http://www.photoformulary.com/Deskto...ion=0&langId=0

    I get very even results. It requires working in the dark, which you might find a drawback. I like the option of varying agitation to tweak the film curve, something you can't do in quite the same way with constant rotary agitation.

    Lee

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Van Buren, Arkansas
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,412
    Images
    101
    There are several ways to go in processing 4x5 sheet film. The Jobo way..in a tube, the Daylight tank way, such as a Combiplan-T tank, and my preferred way, on stainless hangers in deep tanks. I like the "deep" tanks best because I can process lots of film at once. 40 sheets or more, using hangers that hold 4 sheet each of 4x5. Deep tanks are not really "deep", but rather just deep enough to hold the hangers. 3.5 gallons.

    OH, and for those who are really on a budget, you "can" develop sheet film in print trays by the shuffle method.

  6. #6
    rmolson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Mansfield Ohio
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    307
    4x5 Developing options

    I have use an old Unicolor 8x10 processing tube and their Uniroller for years.When I got back into large format I dug out the old processor from the days when I did color printing(never throw anything away) and it worked perfectly The 8 x 10drum holds 4 sheets of 4x5 film within slotted guides and a rubber separator .Never had a film touch another one during processing. The continuous agitation is more or less countered by using a large enough volume of developer. I use 500 cc's of HC-110 1:50 or D-76.full strength. However as I use cold light enlargers I prefer full bodied negatives. You can probably find one on E bay for a song

  7. #7
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,435
    Images
    148
    The Jobo's are daylight tanks, well mine is

    Ian

  8. #8
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Keeping the British end up in Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,871
    Images
    333
    Another person who uses the Uniroller setup.... Pretty slick and can be obtained off Fleabay.
    Please check out my website www.amoxomphotography.com and APUG Portfolio .....

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    588
    (me three)

    Might I suggest the basic equipment and procedures described at the link below.

    http://www.largeformatphotography.info/unicolor/

    The outlay for equipment can be quite low. Although for my own purposes I have chosen to use Chromega drums on the same Unicolor roller bases, the process is still the same. You can develope 4 sheets of your 4x5 film (and/or 4x5, 5x7 and 8x10 prints) in the same drum.
    Last edited by DannL; 02-04-2009 at 11:56 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí

  10. #10
    Bob F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    London
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,984
    Images
    19
    Another user of 25xx series tanks and reels on a CPE2 here. I have never used the 3000 series tanks but I am assured they are a cinch to load. The 2509N are a bit of a pain to load, especially until you get the hang of them - and even then are a bit slow as I find I have to double-check that I have loaded them correctly after each sheet (by feeling along the ends to check that the gap between sheets is even).

    BTW, with the commercially available BTZS tubes you do not have to pour the developer in the dark - the developer goes in the over-size caps and you stand the tubes with caps attached upside down until you are ready to process at which point you place the tubes horizontally and the developer flows into the rest of the tube where the negative is waiting patiently to receive it.
    Last edited by Bob F.; 02-04-2009 at 12:35 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added tube info...

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin