Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,821   Posts: 1,581,649   Online: 883
      
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Steve Mack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Dillwyn, Virginia
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    142

    After exposure, then what?

    I think I've got a handle on what to do with exposed b/w 4X5 sheets until I'm ready to develop them: put 'em back in the box until I have a full box, and then go ahead and process the lot. (Saves on time and chemicals for me.)

    However (comma, he said), I'm not sure what to do with transparencies. Do I put them back into the box until all the sheets are exposed, and then send off the whole box to be processed? I'm not going to try to process E-6 stuff in the cellar. So, how do the rest of you manage transparencies? The photo books are silent on the subject.

    Thanks in advance to all who reply.

    With best regards.

    Stephen S. Mack

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    16,878
    Images
    23
    hi stephen

    you might not want to process all your film at the same time.
    develop your film as you go along, that way if you run into trouble
    with your processing technique, ALL your film won't be in trouble ...
    i am not sure how you are processing your film, but a lot of people
    process a couple of sheets at a time, and if you have a ton of film to process
    that way, you will be there a long long time ...

    with E6 or C41 film just put them in a box and bring them to a lab to process.

    have fun!
    john

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Van Buren, Arkansas
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,412
    Images
    101
    You can put any type of exposed sheet film back into the factory boxes, but you should also use the inner foil or plastic bag to provide an additional layer of light protection. While Kodak film boxes are light-tight, I can't speak for other brands. If you intend to process largish "runs" of sheet film, color or b/w, you might consider the 3.5 gallon plastic or hard rubber developing tanks, and film hangers. These can be found on the used market for quite reasonable prices, and you can process a large volume of sheets at one time.

  4. #4
    David William White's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Hamilton, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,182
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    32
    I just put whatever sheets of Ektachrome I've shot back into the three-part box and drop it off at my local lab. They give me back sleeved sheets and my original box later that day. No biggie.

  5. #5
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,784
    First of all, I'd be a little reluctant to put all my eggs in one basket, so to speak. Second of all, film in the latent image stage is at its most vulnerable. Best practice is to develop sooner, rather than later, when possible.

  6. #6
    razzledog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Melbourne. Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    66
    Images
    6
    I like to get film processed ASAP after exposure. Things can deteriorate fast once it has been exposed to light...at least that's my belief. How could you possibly stand waiting more than a couple of days anyhow? I sure as hell can't.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Van Buren, Arkansas
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,412
    Images
    101
    Quote Originally Posted by razzledog View Post
    I like to get film processed ASAP after exposure. Things can deteriorate fast once it has been exposed to light...at least that's my belief. How could you possibly stand waiting more than a couple of days anyhow? I sure as hell can't.
    I do my own color and b/w processing for my studio photography, as well as my personal photography. I have let exposed Ektachrome sit in a holder for a week in the studio, while I shot enough holders to make up a "run" and I have not experienced ANY deterioration of image quality.

    In some rare instances, I have gone as long as a month between exposure and development of E-6 Ektachrome 4x5, with the film remaining in the film holder. No problems. B/W would have even better keeping qualities.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin