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  1. #1
    KenS's Avatar
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    Loose tripod bushing on a B&J

    The tripod bushing on my 8x10 woodie is now "loose"... The camera had a tendency to 'rotate' a little when inserting the film holder due to the 1/4 inch
    metal bushing on the camera base having become so 'loose'. It now rotates quite freely.

    I am aware that the local hardware store has threaded inserts of this size,
    but I have to think that I might prefer to remove the existing insert then apply a small amount of epoxy and replace it. I am at a loss as to finding the best means of removing the current insert since it now rotates quite freely and a threaded 'bolt' with two or more locking nuts would be the solution for re-inserting but I need to get the original out first.

    Any and all suggestions from experienced bushing replacers would be appreciated.

    Ken
    Quando omni flunkus moritati (R. Green)

  2. #2

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    A suggestion: get a piece of pipe of the same the same diameter and tap it out carefully, or use a round piece of wood the same size for it.

    If the buhsing is threaded just rotate it out !

    Peter

  3. #3
    KenS's Avatar
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    Peter,

    I am unable to determine how 'deep' the bushing is inserted into the 3cm maple
    wood.... it does not go all the way through, and, unlike many 'modern' bushing inserts
    there is no screwdriver 'slot'. I may have to resort to using that stuff (gad it's terrible
    getting old.. my memory fails me at the most awkward moments) my mechanic son
    uses to make sure bolts stay in place. If I 'glue' a 1/4" bolt in, I may be able to extract
    the bushing without too much damage, clean it, and re-insert using an epoxy glue.
    I might feel better if I can get the original to remain in its proper place rather than
    using the rather rough-looking inserts available (and can be ugly, because they are
    usually hidden from sight).

    ....but, I'm still open to other suggestions

    Ken
    Quando omni flunkus moritati (R. Green)

  4. #4

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    In that case try an anker for brick walls: it has a bolt, a nut and a shell that goes outward when tightened.
    Ask you local hardware store, or use a plasic plug and srew of the right size.
    When that is solid, put a piece of wood on top of the tripod (to protect the top) and use pliers.

    Peter

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by KenS View Post
    ...uses to make sure bolts stay in place.
    "Loctite". Make sure you use one of the weaker ones or it'll be permanent.

    Dan

  6. #6
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    KenS,
    A conundrum, to be sure. There is no telling how that bushing has been placed in the camera; perhaps like a reversed mushroom with the parasol top between layers of the wood. So just yanking it out may lead to serious problems. Were it mine (and no brilliant solutions were to come to me in middle of night) I would use a drill press to drill out the metal; starting with a five eights bit just bigger than the quarter inch thread. I would then look to see what I up up against. I can see, then figuring out a way to remove the remainder of the bushing. I might then cut a piece of new maple as a plug to glue into the spot--afixing one of those drive in things you mentioned into the plug before using a professional grade wood glue to glue the whole assemblage back in to the hole. Or not.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  7. #7
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fotoguy20d View Post
    "Loctite". Make sure you use one of the weaker ones or it'll be permanent.

    Dan

    I don't think loctite will work between wood and metal.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    I don't think loctite will work between wood and metal.
    It wouldn't work at all. My impression is that he'll use it to "bond" a screw into the insert and once it's set up, use the screw as a "handle" to twist out the insert. If the insert is in any way deformed to lock it won't come out but if it's just threaded in it might. If the insert does come out cleanly, and it's fully sealed, I might be tempted to try to bond it back into the wood using Titebond II.

    Dan

  9. #9

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    The more I think about trying to loctite a screw into place to help remove the bushing, the worse an idea I think it is. If the bushing doesn't twist out nicely/easily, if you try to pull you might splinter the wood, or, the screw will be stuck in there forever - if ithe bushing is still spinning inside the wood, how will you grab it with enough force to allow you to break the bond?

    Dan

  10. #10
    KenS's Avatar
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    Dan and John,

    I was thinking of something like Loctite to secure a 1/4 inch bolt in the bushing, using a wrench and some
    'pulltwist' to remove the bushing from the wood. If there's a problem with the inside surface of the remaining
    'hole' a Forstner drill bit might be utilised to make the new hole a little wider, and if required a maple 'plug'
    inserted, cut off and sanded flush after which pilot a new hole drilled.... hopefully the bushing might
    then be screwed back in with a small amount of epoxy glue on the thread to make sure it will be secured in
    place.

    Ken
    Quando omni flunkus moritati (R. Green)

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