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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Kat, you might want to contact the Severn Valley Railway for the WWI army uniforms, they have re-enactment weekends, the WWI /WWII uniforms weren't very different.

    I've PM'ed you.

    Ian

  2. #12

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    Ooo good idea, thankyou, I've also got a lead in Wolverhampton via the UNI I need to persue.

  3. #13
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Katier, when using an LF to photograph buildings, several things are important :-

    Use a wide angle lens (a wide angle lens on a 5x4 camera is one with a focal length less than 120mm)

    Pick your view point carefully before putting up the camera

    Use a very sturdy tripod

    Choose a calm day (as someone has previously noted, LFs are effected by the wind & can topple over)

    It is essential you keep the back of the camera perfectly upright - there are usually 2 spirit levels on the back of the camera, one for Left/right tilt and the other fore/aft - they both have to be absolutely spot on after all the other adjustments are made.

    Take your time - they are very slow things to work with

    Have a good sense of humour


    Good luck

    Martin

  4. #14

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    For focusing especially if have not played with LF before, try this

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gR4m70xr9mE

    Good luck.

  5. #15

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    Katier,

    Get Steve Simmons book, or Leslie Stroebel's book, of maybe Jim Stone's (?) book - never seen the last one. All these are good reading for learning the view camera. Simmon's book is basic, Stroebel's book is advanced.

    Read up and you'll have a leg up in the field if you don't have a mentor. A lot of us are self taught, but it isn't the most efficient way to learn when you have time constraints as you do in taking a course.

    Onr thing to keep in mind is that although you can get everything in a plane in focus, a lot of scenes have "depth" to them, and stopping down is the only cure. A simple example is photographing a tree from a moderate distance with a foreground rock. You can get the top of the tree and the rock in focus, but not the bottom of the tree because it isn't in the same plane as the rock and tree top.

    Dry fire the shutter before pulling the dark slide. If the aperture is open for viewing (as in you got in a hurry and forgot to close it), the shutter will not fire. Saves some film.

    Set the camera up when you have time to play with it, and play with it. See what effects movements have on a scene you've composed. See how much rise/shift, etc your lens(es) can take so you know their limitations. Make sure the camera is working properly, movements lock, bellows good (test them in the dark with a flashlight on the inside), and that the lens board lock works smoothly and properly so you don't drop lenses. Clean everything so you don't have dust issues.

    Cheers,

    Steve

  6. #16

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    Great advice, thankyou

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