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  1. #11
    rmolson's Avatar
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    Paper negative test, great idea. Wish I had thought of that before I blew through a bunch of film looking for a light leak
    Years ago and I am dating my self there was a device to check flash snyc using paper .

  2. #12
    wclavey's Avatar
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    It looks to me as if you might be grtting some reflection from the inside surface (facing the lens) of the back on which the ground glass or film holder rests, based on the over exposed strip on the left hand side of the positive image you posted above. I had a similar situation like that on a Crown Graphic as soon as I started using a lens that had more coverage than the original 135mm Optar. So I put self-adhesive black felt on the inside edges and flat surfaces of the back (not on the film holder side) to reduce any reflection of light coming from the lens that was not actually falling on the film and it went away.

  3. #13

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    I've have similar effects on a number of occasions. I suspect it's because I've accidently pulled the film holder away from its seating when withdrawing or reinserting the dark slide. The severity of the the effect of the fault depends on how far the holder is pulled away, the position of the sun relative to the holder, etc.

    If my supposition is correct, there are two solutions - apart from being more careful. 1) Tighten the springs that hold the film holder in place. 2) Hold the ground glass/film holder/camera back assembly tight while withdrawing/reinserting the dark slide.

  4. #14

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    Take two sheets of fast film and load into a dds....Place into camera and remove the slide for a minuet (Do not open the shutter) replace slide and develop both.

    If you have a light leak on the camera there will be fogging on that neg....If the film has been fogged before loading this will show up on the neg where the slide hasn't been removed..........Sorted.

    Cheers Dave

  5. #15

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    Thinking about this carefully, looking at the positive image, I come up with the following:

    The film was not fogged prior to going into the holders - the edges are black.
    The over-exposed strip on the left edge of the frame is due to the shutter hanging up at the end as it closed - this is only apparent in the 1/30s frame. In the faster shutter shots, the shutter didn't hang and no strip is visible.
    The under-exposed section on top, was actually on the bottom of the camera when exposing the film, so it can't be due to the bellows sagging, which I didn't see when I looked in the camera. Also, its not due to stray light reflections since then it would be over, not under exposed. Also, not due to a light leak in the camera (again, under-exposure, not over, not to mention how straight it is - otherwise it would appear as fog) The slight angle and straight edge of the area make me think this is a bellows shadow - I need to see how the bellows are sitting when compressed back enough to focus this shot. I was thinking perhaps it's at the back of the bellows at the bottom, but it doesn't seem likely. Maybe a fold closer to the front or in the middle is sagging down just enough (or was in this setup).

    Dan

  6. #16
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Looks like the whole stack of film was fogged at the edges at some time in the past. There is fog all along the left edge of the negative, it is 'under' the shadow of the film guide and is heaviest at the extreme edge of the film. Try developing an unloaded/unexposed sheet and see if it exhibits edge fogging.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

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