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  1. #11
    Prest_400's Avatar
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    While I haven't used any camera that has a VF/GG that projects images upside down or back to front I think that I Would compose better; Objects distract me a lot.
    However, turning the SLR upside down doesn't work
    Last edited by Prest_400; 06-19-2009 at 05:24 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: vocabulary correction

  2. #12
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Most of my composition is done without looking even at or through a camera, only the framing is done via a viewfinder, ground glass screen or occasionally sports finder. This is regardless of camera type or format.

    I do use a Crown Graphic & Speed Graphics hand-held and I focus via the screen and frame via the Viewfinder, or Sports finder when I use a wide angle.

    On a tripod I use only the ground glass screen with LF.

    Ian

  3. #13
    Thingy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prest_400 View Post
    While I haven't used any camera that has a VF/GG that projects images upside down or back to front I think that I Would compose better; Objects distract me a lot.
    However, turning the SLR upside down doesn't work

    You need to dangle upsidedown from a trapeze and then looks through yout SLR viewfinder!
    The Thing

    Portfolio

    Film Cameras currently used:
    Large/Stort-format: Ebony 45SU (field camera), Medium/Medlem-format: Mamiya 7, Hasselblad 503CW
    35mm/Små format: Nikon: F4, D800 (yes digital, I know)

  4. #14
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    One of the important tricks I teach painters is to turn their paintings upside down on the easel after they have laid down a rough sketch or underpainting. It removes the "meaning" from the objects in the painting and allows them to see the relationship between dark and light, positive and negative space much more easily. If the composition doesn't work upside down, it's probably not very good.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteymorange View Post
    One of the important tricks I teach painters is to turn their paintings upside down on the easel after they have laid down a rough sketch or underpainting. It removes the "meaning" from the objects in the painting and allows them to see the relationship between dark and light, positive and negative space much more easily. If the composition doesn't work upside down, it's probably not very good.
    YES!

    i had painting teachers like that.
    it is one of the best techniques there is ...

    john
    ask me how ..

  6. #16
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    At this point I honestly don't notice. It almost always catches me off guard these days when someone looks through one of my cameras and comments.

  7. #17

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    John K, it's only rightside up in Australia if you use a camera made in the northern hemisphere. LOL
    Mike

  8. #18
    papagene's Avatar
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    Like Jason I don't remember the image being upside down as it has become so natural to me. And like Whitey and John, most of us former art students learned to turn our artwork upside down to check our composition.

    What gets me is that after making the exposure I don't remember seeing it in color at all. My memory of the scene is in black and white.

    gene
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
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  9. #19

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    Upside down isn't a problem. It is the 'backwards' that gives me fits. Still can't compose facing the wrong way... I need to see the ground glass.

  10. #20

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    No, it's not natural

    Sorry to be a party-pooper here, but I hear a whole lot of rationalization going on in this discussion trying to support the upside-down image on the ground glass as being "natural".

    I don't buy it.

    No way is it natural. While I'm sure that those who have viewed such upside-down images hundreds or thousands of times have learned to accommodate it, I don't think anyone can convince me that it's as natural as viewing the scene right-side-up.

    I wish it weren't so, and that my ground glass showed the scene the way I see it with my eyes. But it is, so like everyone else I learn to live with it. But please, get real: don't let's insist that it's easy or "natural".
    I'm mostly interested in the equipment in and of itself. Pictures are just a side effect.

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