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  1. #21

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    Question, i am totaly confused... will a Polaroid 405 or a Fuji PA145 back fit on a Speed Graphic Camera?

  2. #22
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    It will fit if it has the Graflok type back. The ground glass frame will be attached to the camera by two silver hooks that act as springs. Press down and slide these out to remove the frame and then you can use the two metal sliding bars next to the frame to hold the polaroid back onto the camera.
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  3. #23
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    Good morning, Bob;

    From a slightly different point of view (but one that was alluded to), I use instant film for checking my set-ups and seeing what I have done with my 4 by 5 before putting in a holder with a regular film sheet. As a person who got a view camera only last summer, this film type has been very helpful for me as someone learning to use a view camera. Greg Davis has referred to using it as a testing medium with his students. Well, as a "student," I think that it really does help in seeing the result of the movements you just did with the camera.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

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  4. #24

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    I thought I'd add a little help on the film pack types, how they look, and how they fit.

    Here is a pic of 3 holders, the one on the bottom is a Grafmatic, the one in the middle is a Fuji PA-45, and the one on the top is a Fuji PA-145. The PA-45 makes a true 4x5 print, the PA-145 makes a smaller 4.24x3.25 print.



    The instant film holders are put in the camera the same way standard film holders are. They are a lot thicker than regular 2-sheet holders, but not much wider than a Grafmatic.

    Here's my Wista with a PA-45 in place.



    If the loader won't fit behind the the ground glass on your particular camera's back, you can install it like this, using the Graflok sliding locks (PA-45 holder shown).



    The PA-145 (smaller model) works well for checking exposure, but the image on film will be smaller than the image shown on the ground glass, so you'll have to compose accordingly.

  5. #25
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sangetsu View Post
    The PA-145 (smaller model) works well for checking exposure, but the image on film will be smaller than the image shown on the ground glass, so you'll have to compose accordingly.
    Just a small point of clarification for new users. The image itself will not be 'smaller' as far as image size is concerned, but because the piece of film is smaller the image will be masked to the size of the film.

    If you set up the camera, attach the PA-145 and make a 3.25x4.25 image, then put the PA-45 on the camera and make a 4x5 image, the part of the image that is captured on the smaller film will be exactly the same size as that portion of the image on the larger film. But since the film is smaller, less of the image field is captured.

    I have pencil lines on my ground glass that indicates the image size and position for 405 film.

    MB
    Last edited by michaelbsc; 07-01-2009 at 09:19 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling
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  6. #26
    GJA
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    For me it is not the price of the back, but the price of the instant film that limits me.

    I figured it would be about $3.75 per shot, and I would rather compose carefully, meter carefully and bracket exposure and development times than spend that much to check my shots.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by GJA View Post
    For me it is not the price of the back, but the price of the instant film that limits me.

    I figured it would be about $3.75 per shot, and I would rather compose carefully, meter carefully and bracket exposure and development times than spend that much to check my shots.
    Instant backs are best for those who are learning the ropes of large format photography. Not knowing the results until after processing makes it a little more difficult to pin down what went wrong when the picture was taken.

    How much it costs depends a lot on how how much you pay for the film. Basic Fuji instant film (100B) runs about 1570 yen for 10 sheets (about $1.50 per sheet) of the smaller format. The price for the 4x5 instant sheets is about 2500 yen per 10 sheets ($2.50 per sheet). Fuji Acros runs about 75 yen per sheet, so bracketing shots would run 150, or 225 yen, which brings the price up quite a bit.

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