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  1. #1

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    Polarizing Filter on Ground Glass

    Just shot a beach scene using an old Graflex 4x5 camera and a Fujinon 125mm lens. The sun was in perfect place for a polarizing filter and when I held the filter to the naked eye, aimed at the scene, and rotated it, I easily saw variations in the effect of the filter. In the ground glass of the camera, though, I could see no effect from rotating the filter (or almost no effect). Eventually, I just took the position of the filter held to my eye and put it on the camera in that position, hoping for the best. Am I just seeing things (or in this case not seeing things) or does the ground glass not show the polarizing effect?

  2. #2

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    The lens rotates the image 180 degrees onto your GG.

    Have you tried to apply this ???

    Peter

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by archphoto View Post
    The lens rotates the image 180 degrees onto your GG.

    Have you tried to apply this ???

    Peter
    As I said, I rotated the filter, of course. Not sure what you meant by the lens rotating the image 180 degrees. In any case, a private message let me know that ground glass is too dim to notice effect of filter and that the technique I used was the standard one. So thanks for that.

  4. #4
    AndersPS's Avatar
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    I┤ve read somewhere that a polarizing filter works best if you have the sun 45 or 90 degrees behind you. But I could be wrong!

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by AndersPS View Post
    I┤ve read somewhere that a polarizing filter works best if you have the sun 45 or 90 degrees behind you. But I could be wrong!
    Yes, I'm pretty sure that the filter works in a 90 degree arc from a straight line drawn from where the camera is standing to the sun (so if the sun rises due east, at dawn, the filter's effect is greatest shooting due north or due south). My problem was not in with the filter or the position of the sun, but with the fact that the effects of the filter were not visible in the ground glass. I couldn't figure out whether I was going blind or crazy, but I've been informed (in a private email response to my post) that I was not, that in fact the glass is not bright enough to show the difference. So I was doing the right thing all along, I guess. I had used a polarizing filter on digital cameras before, and saw the changes from rotating the filter even in an electronic viewfinder, so I was surprised.

  6. #6

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    Hm. A few months ago I used a polarizer on my 4x5 quite a bit. I could see the sky darken on the ground glass as I rotated the polarizer. It probably depends a lot on the scene, lens and type of ground glass. I was using a 210mm F5.6 lens with a Toyo screen.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter De Smidt View Post
    Hm. A few months ago I used a polarizer on my 4x5 quite a bit. I could see the sky darken on the ground glass as I rotated the polarizer. It probably depends a lot on the scene, lens and type of ground glass. I was using a 210mm F5.6 lens with a Toyo screen.
    That's useful. I'm using a Graflex, which is, if I'm not mistaken, a 50 year old press camera not designed, I'd wager, to be used with polarizing filters. (In fact, I'll bet most owners used the camera with a rangefinder and skipped the ground glass altogether.) The glass is thick and dim, generally. So maybe what I really need is a true view camera.

  8. #8
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobalobo View Post
    That's useful. I'm using a Graflex, which is, if I'm not mistaken, a 50 year old press camera not designed, I'd wager, to be used with polarizing filters. (In fact, I'll bet most owners used the camera with a rangefinder and skipped the ground glass altogether.) The glass is thick and dim, generally. So maybe what I really need is a true view camera.
    And the GAS begins!

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    And the GAS begins!

    Steve
    What does this mean?

  10. #10

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    "GAS" means Gear Acquisition Syndrome. But I don't think you need a new camera. First, try cleaning the ground surface of your ground glass. Dish soap works. (Take the groundglass off of the camera. Put a little soap and water on it. Rub a little bit with a soft sponge, and rinse under running water. Let dry. Make sure to install it with the ground surface facing the lens.) If that doesn't do it, you can get a replacement ground glass.

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