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  1. #1
    malcao's Avatar
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    Do you adjust your aperture?

    I'm aware of that the shutter speed isn't exact but how about the aperture? It never crossed my mind until I bought my second Schneider 360mm (400€ looks like new, couldn't let it pass
    When comparing them I notice that they differ by about 1/3 stop.
    Anyone had any thoughts about this and do you adjust your aperture?

  2. #2
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Is it possible that while maintaining the same overall appearance, there was a slight modification in the design and the aperture was changed? The only thing I can think of is to stick a flat art incident meter in the back of your view camera, and use it to re-mark your f stop markings. Alternatively, it's possible that the f stop scale can be loosened with a set screw and then rotated to be calibrated, but I'm, not familiar with your particular lens.

    PS; I'm surprised that no one else has commented on this yet... Unusual for APUG...
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Well an Uncoated, Single coated and Multi-coated lens design of the same aperture will pass differing amounts of light.

    In practice there's very little difference between my single (& well) coated 1950's 150mm T CZJ Tessar and my Multi-coated Schneider's & Rodenstock's. So there's no need to make any adjustment.

    Ian

  4. #4
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    This comes under knowing your equipment. If you are in a situation where exposure is very critical, you know the differences in your lenses and can compensate accordingly. I have an old Gossen light meter that reads about 1/2 stop high. Otherwise it is fine, so I just remember that.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  5. #5
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Your aperture scale may not be the correct one for the lens. Making aperture scales and /or calibrating them is certainly somethig LF photographers are interested in. There are many threads on this topic.

  6. #6
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    It may be of use to rememebger that the exposure is determined by the ACTUAL f/stop, where f/= distance to film plane / aperture diameter. The lens, accompanied by the aperture, is normally extended out beyond the "Infinity Focal Length" when taking anything closer than "infinity focus" - most noticable in "close-up" photography. Many "bellows equiped cameras wil have an exposure compensation scale linked to the bellows.
    Most lenses have the apertures marked for infinity focal length, and will automatically underexpose.

    Another photographic anomally, "inaccurate f/stops", worthy of consideration.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  7. #7

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    I have never been bothered by the minor exposure differences except those of greater magnitude from poor shutter speed performance. So, no, I have never even thought of adjusting (calibrating) aperture.

  8. #8

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    I'm not sure you can adjust the aperture. The blades are fixed to the blade operating ring & that's it.
    You might be able to fudge with the maximum aperture but it wouldn't have any effect on the rest of them.
    Grimes may be able to test the lens & make you a new f-stop plate for $$$.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  9. #9

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    I'm just repeating others here but... if need be you could make a new aperture scale calibrated to the lens (or have one made), or you could tape a paper one over the existing scale, or you could just keep a chart of corrections and adjust by that. As others have stated, the scale "should" be very accurate unless there's something awry.

  10. #10
    malcao's Avatar
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    On the 360/6.8 Symmar-S you can adjust the aperture at both the start point and end point. I changed one of the lenses so they appear to be more or less the same. Before you could just notice the aperture blades at 6.8 if you move the stop screw one pinhole you will have a full opening and go past 6.8 on the aperture scale, I'm not sure if this mean 5.6 anyway it's nice to have the option to shoot wide open.



 

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