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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaimeb82 View Post
    When you take a picture in a 4x5 system. Do you always flip the card holder and take the same picture as a back up?

    Do you then develop first one sheet and base on the results develop the other one base on first results? Is this a common practice one should get into?
    When I was a newbie I did exactly this. Over time I shot a lot and got better. I got better at nailing the exposure. Got better at nailing the process. Got better at handling film and film holders. And I found that I was never using the backups.

    So I decided to work without a net. I now make exactly one exposure for just about all scenes. The exceptions are 1) motion, and 2) different apertures to control DOF. If I have any questions about either I'll make a second shot. But I process them all the same.

    There's nothing wrong with making the second exposure. If it's useful. But if it's just a security blanket, you out grow it eventually.
    Bruce Watson
    AchromaticArts.com

  2. #22
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    And I was thinking it was just the British and Canadians who worked without that safety blanket

    I was taught that relying on your technique and skills no safety net actually helps hone them. It's different with commercial work but it means you tend to make alternative images rather than duplicates.

    Ian

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    I was taught that relying on your technique and skills no safety net actually helps hone them.
    Yes. Indeed it does.
    Bruce Watson
    AchromaticArts.com

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    I was taught that relying on your technique and skills no safety net actually helps hone them.
    Sure, but once you're out of the classroom and concerned with real world issues like scratches and bugs and darkroom faux pas...

    There is indeed a lesson in trying to get it all done in one shot. But I have had backups save me many times. There is a lesson in that as well.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  5. #25
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    I will also add that my printing process can be rough on negatives, so having an identical back-up neg can be nice.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    I will also add that my printing process can be rough on negatives, ..
    Just curious, how so?
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  7. #27
    outwest's Avatar
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    When I was shooting chromes I would sometimes shoot a second sheet at 1/2 stop under. If the first sheet turned out to be over, I had the second sheet processed normally. If the first sheet turned out to be under, I had the second sheet pushed one stop. Sort of a 3 shot bracket using only 2 sheets.

  8. #28

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    Just my opinion but when you're using a very deeply tinted filter with B&W... say a Wratten #29 or #64... you'd better bracket and you'd better take extra shots to pinpoint development procedures. If you don't use filters then you can easily pinpoint the exposure but, other than the price of film, there is no harm in taking an extra shot because... stuff happens such as leaky film holders, finger prints, darkroom errors, etc. This also holds true with color negs with commercial processing because... stuff happens. Yes, I'm repeating myself.

  9. #29
    BradS's Avatar
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    I have, but only on rare instances.

    I have tons of film holders and film is cheap but, I am almost never able to carry enough loaded film holders to be able to waste half of my film. On a big day, I might make twenty exposures....so it would mean carrying forty loaded film holders versus twenty! and, though I have (more than) forty film holders, I would never dream of carrying that many at once. Usually, twelve is plenty for a full days worth of shooting 4x5.

    The simple fact is, nothing I do photographically is really that important. If I loose one or two here and there to exposure blunders or processing errors it just doesn't matter. I'll still be drawing oxygen and emitting carbon dioxide...

  10. #30

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    The farther I am from home, the more likely.

    Mike

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