Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,940   Posts: 1,585,665   Online: 961
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    AndersPS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Öckerö, Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    62

    What is this thingie?

    I´m not sure I write in the right thread but here´s my question:

    I saw a YouTube video about Fred Picker, (I´m sure you know who he is?) and about 1:30min in he pick up a thing that he looks through? what´s that? and where can you find it? is it a good thing to have?

    Here´s the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYiGa...rom=PL&index=9

    ///Anders S

  2. #2
    Denis P.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Croatia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    466
    Images
    9
    Anders, that's a Zone VI viewing filter. Google it for more information.
    It's supposed to help you visualise the tonality in B&W.
    Doesn't work for everybody (haven't tried one myself, so I can't say anything about its usability).

    Denis

  3. #3
    Jerevan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,882
    Images
    9
    It's the same thing as a Kodak Wratten #90 filter. Never tried it, either.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Shooter
    Med. Format Pan
    Posts
    356
    been there, done that.

    I have watched Fred's tapes on printing and on taking pictures. I have also tried the filter thing. if you get a chance, the tape on printing is brilliant, and will make you depressed for at least a day thinking that you are never going to be that good...LOL

    A yellow filter is a good thing to use to visualize a scene, but I have found that unless you are using it in rather bright light, it is somewhat useless-- give it a try sometime. You can also sometimes find them on the evil-bay.
    * Just because your eyes are closed, doesn't mean the lights in the darkroom are off. *
    * When the film you put in the camera is worth more than the camera you put the film in... *
    * When I started using 8x10, it amazed me how many shots were close to the car. *

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Richmond VA.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,934
    Excellant video!

    Jeff

  6. #6
    AndersPS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Öckerö, Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    62
    I found one on fleebay, but it was for 4x5...does it matter if I use this when I shoot in 135mm film?

    Offtopic: where could I read about Fred Picker? I want to know more about him. Stupid question...I just gonna Google him. But ifI don´t find anything useful on google, where do you think I can read more?

    ///Anders S

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,567
    Images
    91
    The viewing filter can be used for any format, since the intent is only to approximate B&W tonality in a scene.

    Slightly OT, but there is a Fred Picker print for sale in the insight photography project fund raising auction. See http://www.insight-photography.org/T...y_Project.html
    The gallery hosting the event is in Fred's old stomping grounds (Brattleboro, VT).

  8. #8
    juan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    St. Simons Island, Georgia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,646
    Images
    4
    Fred wrote a series of newsletters from about 1977 until about 1995. About a year ago someone here was investigating having them all scanned to pdfs, then hosting them at a university site. Calument (which owns the rights) was considering allowing it, but I don't know the status of the project.

    The viewing filter was also used to frame a scene - thus the different formats. But the viewing filter was the same in all. I use my 35mm for my 8x10 camera.

    If you can find the Zone VI Newsletters, you can learn a great deal about Fred - from his own pen. Try it.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    105
    Images
    14
    The Zone VI viewing filter can be very helpful if you have realistic expectations and know what it is actually supposed to do. It helps in determining whether you might want to use, for example, a yellow, green, or red filter to separate tones in the scene. In a shot of a green and red pepper side by side with color film there is a dramatic difference between the two visually, but in a black and white print they may look nearly identical, depending on the black and white film you choose. When you look at the scene through the Zone VI filter, it will help you approximate what a black and white print of that scene wil look like and whether a filter would produce the separation you are hoping for.
    The Zone VI filter takes a little getting used to and will not perfectly render what every black and white film will produce, but could be worth trying out in terms of helping you visualize results.
    Good luck with it if you do try it.
    Doug Webb

  10. #10
    AndersPS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Öckerö, Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Webb View Post
    When you look at the scene through the Zone VI filter, it will help you approximate what a black and white print of that scene wil look like and whether a filter would produce the separation you are hoping for.
    When I look thru the Zone-filter, can I put a yellow, red or a green filter in front of it and get the result, or is it just trial and error until I know what filter to use? many qustions, but I want to be sure before I buy one and if I have any use for it in my photobag

    ///Anders S

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin