Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,301   Posts: 1,536,079   Online: 923
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31
  1. #21
    Bruce A Cahn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    43
    I used my Master Technika for portraits and loved the results. Unfortunately the (current) viewfinder was not totally accurate so after the initial delight of hand holding, I settled for ground glass focusing. This will not be a problem for everyone. I am very picky about exact framing and usually keep to my no cropping rule. Now I use an 8x10 or 5x7 Ebony for portraits, and once in a while a 6x7, 6x6, 35mm or digital. There is no problem holding the Linhof for long exposures if you have the grip. I would hold the grip with my left hand and hold the right front of the camera with my right, which was then in a perfect place to trip the shutter. 1/4 second was very possible, sometimes 1/2. Now that I am older and shakier, I use a tripod for almost everything.

  2. #22
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    It's a good camera or portraits because it can be either a view camera for static shooting, or a rangefinder/viewfinder camera for more active shooting, and they can be cammed for many lenses, unlike a Graphic, which can only be set for one lens at a time (though later Speeds do use cams). You also have the option of shooting 4x5, 6x9, 6x7, and 6x6. They are well made. They are heavy. A monopod might help at times. You can get them in medium format versions, and also in 5x7 versions.

    In all honesty, I think a Super Speed would be just as good for this purpose, and will be cheaper and I assume significantly lighter...though I have never actually weighed a Super Speed.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #23
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Bokeh Guy View Post
    Here's a question. I have a Rolleiflex Tele that I've used some and it works (and is cool, etc.), but I'm wondering if I trade it in for a Linhof. I have a 2.8F and I could be wrong on this, but sounds like the Linhof would give me a little more flexibility with portraits (I'm talking lenses). Any thoughts?
    I will trade you one of my Linhof III (version four) kits for it! Each kit has three original cammed lenses (one is 90, 150, 240, and the other is 90, 150, 360). It would make a nice complement to my Rollei Wide, which I lucked upon at a local thrift shop in near-mint condition.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 11-19-2009 at 08:10 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    42
    Thanks for all the comments. While I understand that it can be used as a rangefinder, I'm actually looking at it more for tripod portraits - up close, etc. I have the Leicas and Rolleis for handhelds, but was admiring more than a few Linhof portraits on the web. I've been asked to display some work in a gallery in February and the Leica portraits, while good, aren't up to snuff on size.

    2F/2F - thanks for the offer, but I've decided to keep the tele. I have a Leica R system that I've decided to sell off, if possible, to finance the Linhof if I buy one.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    692
    There's nothing that I can see that makes the Linhof any better/worse for ground glass use for portraits. I haven't had it long, but it's just a light tight box for holding a lens and film. Heavy sucker too. That doesn't matter on a tripod. The only thing the Technika V has that my $100 Speed Graphic doesn't have (for portraits) is longer bellows. OOPS, the rotating back too. The Speed counters that shortcoming with the focal plane shutter. Neither is perfect.
    Wayne
    Deep in the darkest heart of the East Texas Rain forest. Apprentice Analog Activist.
    ... And to paraphrase Yoda, there is no how, only do.
    Vaughn
    My Photos Online

  6. #26
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,234
    Images
    20
    Again, the rangefinder is not just for handheld photography, and is very useful for portraits with a tripod, because you can check focus with a filmholder loaded and ready to shoot.

    With groundglass focusing it's focus, stop down lens, cock shutter, insert filmholder, remove darkslide, and shoot.

    With the rangefinder you can still establish an initial composition on the groundglass, adjust the aperture, cock the shutter, insert filmholder, but then you can remove the darkslide, wait for the right expression, check focus with the rangefinder, frame with the viewfinder, and shoot, so you can be a bit more spontaneous.

    If you're not using the rangefinder, then there are better options for a studio camera than a Technika. I find it very quick to work with a Sinar P, and the larger lensboards are a plus for classic portrait lenses.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #27
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    Get an old Kodak / Leitz / Voigtlander rangefinder.

    Fasten it to the camera (Sinar, Crown, whatever)
    Set up the shot, adjust the rangefinder.

    Check focus before shooting. The model might lean, you might slide the camera... works.

    A piece of string works pretty well, too.

    .

  8. #28
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,234
    Images
    20
    I'm a big fan of the string trick as well and use it often for 8x10" and larger portraits. It's absolutely reliable.

    I've used the uncoupled rangefinder and focusing scale method when I had a 4x5" Tech II for a while, and it works, but the coupled rangefinder on a Tech III or later takes one step out of the process.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    42
    Thanks for all the responses. I've been looking at the Linhof, not as a studio camera, but as a location camera. Frankly, right now the tripod is appealing because I have a couple of Rolleiflexes that I can use for handheld shots.

    I am a little bit in the dark on the cammed lenses though. One Linhof that I'm looking at has two cammed lenses, a 110mm and 150mm. If I bought some other lenses, I'd have to have those cammed if I wanted to use them on the rangefinder?

    I'm doing a portrait series on a particular topic and appreciate the string suggestion. Will have to try it out.

  10. #30
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,234
    Images
    20
    Yes, if you want lenses to be coupled to the rangefinder, they need to be cammed, and they need infinity stops, and you get a focusing scale as part of the package. For the Tech V and Master Tech, cammed lenses are interchangeable among camera bodies, so you can also buy new or used lenses with the cam and set the infinity stops yourself, though it's not a bad idea to send the camera to Linhof service to install the stops accurately and check the rangefinder and groundglass calibration at the same time.

    Uncammed lenses can be used with groundglass or scale focusing, but if you have focusing scales for your uncammed lens (you can make one or buy one from Linhof, if the lens is a standard focal length) and at least one cammed lens, you can use the rangefinder cam for the cammed lens to measure the subject distance, read it off the focusing scale for the cammed lens, and then adjust the focus according to the scale for the uncammed lens. This works for any rangefinder press camera.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin