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  1. #11

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    Well... I'm going to agree with Keith on this one. I'll soon have a lightweight 4x5 but I won't be shooting sheet film. It'll be dedicated soley for 6x12cm roll film. If I want to shoot sheet film I'll drag the 5x12in out (once I have it). It's been a long time since I shot 4x5. I LOVED the view camera methodology but I was always disappointed that I didn't move up something bigger.

  2. #12
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    You may want to consider something more portrait friendly than the Rolleiflex (I'm assuming that it is a TLR Rollei). If all I shot were portraits, I'd be using a RB67 or RZ67 with a few extra backs. It has everything you need including close focussing to make it a great portrait camera. If I were to shoot portraits in large format, I'd go with an 8x10 or 5x7 and contact print. 4x5 requires you to be very methodical and very comfortable with the sitter. I sure couldn't do it very easily!

  3. #13
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bokeh Guy View Post
    My forté is portraits, not landscapes.
    You need to find somebody that has an 8x10 and set up a portrait with it.

    I went to a Large Format workshop a few weeks back and we did portraits one morning.

    When you get under the dark cloth and see a face on the ground glass that's nearly life size it will just knock your socks off.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #14

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    Honestly, I have no problems enlarging 645 negs to 16X20, just use finer grain (slower) films and they go up in size nicely.

  5. #15
    Perry Way's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bokeh Guy View Post
    Here's the dilemma: I've moved from 35mm to MF and have loved using a couple of new Rolleiflexes. I love the big negatives, tones, format, etc. Because of this, I sold off one 35mm system and now have some money to spend. Question is: Do I take a dive in 4x5, which I understand is very different from MF, or do I go ahead and delve into digital 35mm and buy a bodythat backs up my film 35mm (and MF to a degree). My forté is portraits, not landscapes.

    I would suggest since you have 35mm and MF underway already and some extra $'s, why not try 4x5? But bear in mind that large format is expensive. You can't use the same equipment for processing and enlarging, so just keep that in mind. I have found that it helps to be well equipped in one format than halfway equipped in two or more formats. But more than anything else, stay away from making it a chore for you. When I got started in large format, I did tray development, and it was no fun at all because I use my bathroom as a take-down darkroom and my trays are on a wire shelf I extend over the tub and it is no fun to be bent over agitating trays in the dark. Now I have the BTZS tubes and I can develop in the light for half of the development and dim light for a good part of the remaining and it fits more nicely on my sink countertop. Only the hypo clear and water bath sit on the wire shelf now, so I'm only half breaking my back now as opposed to all the way Anyway, long story short, just make sure you have all the essentials covered with your budget and you'll be fine. If you don't, my suggestion is to hold back until you do.
    I love the wilderness and I love my trail cameras, all Fuji's! :) GA645, GW690 III, and the X100 which I think is the best trail camera ever invented (to date).

  6. #16
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    to the OP:

    if you like bokeh(your name implies you do) then go straight for the throat (8x10)....

    I haven't shot any on my camera yet(POS no-name I was gifted with some darkroom stuff a few years back), and the 300mm lens is great(no shutter though).

    if you want bokeh, get a 300 or 450mm 5.6/6.8 and shoot it wide open. you'll get some bad@** bokeh!!!

    just sayin.... EFKE and Arista films are great. I use them for 4x5 regularly, and they contact print very well. Been using EFKE 25 in D76 1+1, rating it at 50, and the results have been great!

    -Dan


  7. #17

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    what did everyone do before the internet when they had to make a purely subjective decision?

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by photomem View Post
    Honestly, I have no problems enlarging 645 negs to 16X20, just use finer grain (slower) films and they go up in size nicely.
    Sorry, you have no idea. Probably good you keep it that way.


    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  9. #19

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    With your handle of BOKEHGUY, as others have noted, you probably would find exploring the plane of focus, using view camera movements (swings and tilts), a very rewarding path with your interest in portraits.

  10. #20
    Willie Jan's Avatar
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    The benefit for 4x5 is that you also can do macro work,stilllfe, architecture etc... with it.
    Be aware that portraits in the street like cartier bresson is out of the question. It's a slow system...
    But MF is also nice and has enough quality for prints such as 30x30cm. I almost never print larger from my 6x6.
    The 4x5 is used for landscapes because this allows me to adjust movements that give me a larger depth of field which can not be reached with MF.

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