Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,828   Posts: 1,582,128   Online: 1087
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: Beginner to 4X5

  1. #1
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,782
    Images
    23

    Beginner to 4X5

    Hi Guys-
    I have shot 135 and MF and now I would love to try 4X5. I am stunned with the cameras, negs, and prints after seeing some in person last night. I want to get a beginners camera and want to keep it very economical in the beginning to see if it is something I really want to do a lot of. I was looking at the older Calumet monorail cameras. The price is definatly right. I have looked at a couple with Schneider lenses which seem to be highly reccomended from what I have read. I have not come across many recent thoughts on this cameras though.....Thanks for your input.

    Patrick
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    Hi. Those cameras are fine. I used them quite a bit when I was learning 4x5, as well as several other old low-level monorails. There is one that seems nice and has a case, but no lens in the APUG classified section right now. For a camera of that style, I suggest a Graphic View II with the Graflok back, instead, however. IMO, they are much more solid, and not that much more expensive. Newer Cambos and Toyos are also an incredible bargain, and often come with a case and a modern lens, and are full-on system cameras unlike the old cheap metal ones. However, if you can get started with a normalish lens (135 - 210), there is nothing wrong with the old metal ones, and they are certainly cheap. Just get a lens that allows ample movements. I suggest a 210 to start.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 12-03-2009 at 04:10 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #3
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,782
    Images
    23
    2F- did you happen to get my PM?
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  4. #4
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,782
    Images
    23
    What is the advantage to the Graflok back?
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  5. #5
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI U.S.A.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,559
    Images
    3
    2F,

    Just curious, why do you suggest a 210mm for starters?
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
    2F,

    Just curious, why do you suggest a 210mm for starters?
    More than ample image circle for learning how to use movements. When I first learned with a 150, I vignetted quite often when applying my desired and/or required movements.

    I also think that the 210 gives a nice working distance for a wide variety of subjects, and gives more bellows draw, which I think helps when using movements.

    If you just want a big neg and a little bit of shift, IMO, choose a FL that will simply give you the desired angle of view. However, if you want to learn how to use movements (which I assume you do, given that you are looking at monorails and not press cameras), it helps to have some breathing room at first. 210 is IMO the most versatile FL, especially when first learning. If you want to really learn movements and learn them extremely solidly and quickly, you will start by keeping the camera indoors and shooting still lifes at close working distances.

    Never got the PM, Ektgraphic. It seems to happen quite a lot on APUG, actually.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 12-03-2009 at 04:44 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    560
    I would go with a 180mm or wider to start. 180mm are dirt cheap on KEH- even modern multicoated optics. The only problem with Calumet monorails is that they are heavy. If you don't plan on hiking with them though it doesn't matter much.

  8. #8
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,782
    Images
    23
    I am not going hiking...would it be too much to put on one of the older Tiltall Tripods?
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  9. #9
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,027
    Images
    1
    great little cameras from what I've found! Personally, I would look more at the Cambos or Toyo's, since there are more options down the road in terms of goodies(bag bellows for your 90, extension rails for your 600mm, etc...) but this is just hypothetical guessing .

    besides, they are DIRT CHEAP on the auction site. lensboards for the older Calumet monorails are a little hard to come by if you don't have the tools to make your own lensboards. Cambo and toyo boards are like ants, they're everywhere .

    as 2F stated above, 210 is a great way to learn 4x5. However, it will kind of like using an 85mm in 35mm focal length specs, so you will have to back up if you shoot people or other things.

    get what you can afford, but definitely wait if you don't feel 100% right on something. there will almost always be another one down the road(hopefully)

    -Dan


  10. #10
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Boston area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,325
    Images
    26
    The older Calumet (400 series) are great, but don't plan on walking too far with one - they're ungainly beasts. Still, the fact that you can make your own lens boards (4x4) and that, if you get the long bellows you can buy an extra long monorail, cut it in two pieces and have a short one, a regular length one and one for long lenses. Add a bag bellows and you have a pretty extensive system for very little money. One point, however, if you have the long monorail you will find that shooting with a "normal" lens means the rail is in the image or poking you in the chest. Don't pay more than about $120 for one- they are plentiful.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin