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Thread: Light Leaks

  1. #1
    bmac's Avatar
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    I just posted a pic in the non gallery photos gallery. Would someone be so kind as to let me know if they think it is a holder light leak, or a camera leak?

    thanks,
    Brian
    hi!

  2. #2
    Chaska's Avatar
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    Looks like the holder to me. The holders that came with my Voightlander Avus produce negatives like this. Luckily it came with a roll film holder that works with no leaks so I know it is not the camera bellows. Pretty fun camera by the way!

  3. #3
    Ole
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    It's difficult to tell from just one picture. But the light has entered from the bottom of the film, just about parallell to the film plane. At the bottom of the image (remember the film is upside down in the camera), there is a reflection from the top of the film holder.

    Odds are good that it's a leak in the tape on the flap of the film holder. Camera leaks usually aren't that parallell to the film plane.

    The leak I has was in the seal between camera back and film holder - it showed some of the same characteristics, but stayed a fixed distance from the edge of the film.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  4. #4

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    Brian,

    I had a leak very much like this on one of my Deardorffs. I chased this at the holder level until I almost went nuts. The light leak ended up being pin holes in the creases of the bellows folds.

    There is one way to check this out for sure. That is to take a holder and place in the camera with darkslide in place. Remove the lens board and place a flashlight into the camera cavity with the bellows extended. With the lights off in the room, begin shining around the interior of the camera and if the leak is at the camera back or the bellows you will see light. If you see light, you can be assured that it will leak light under exposure conditions.

    You can also check your holders in the same way. Remove the dark slide from the holder and shine the light...check the trap and the hinge. If you see light the holder will leak. Good luck.

  5. #5

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    Good suggestions, Don. I will try them right now on my Deardorff & holders!
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  6. #6

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    I too had pin hole leaks in the bellows of my Deardorff. I solved the problem with neoprene cement. I live at the beach, close to surf and dive shops. It is a standard shelf item for the repair of wetsuits. Anyone living in less sublime environs can contact me for the brand name and you can research how to get some.
    My biggest (literally) light leak problem was with my ancient Kodak Empire State 11x14 camera with a no-name back. This coupled with a weird array of holders, some with 80 year-old light traps. I solved this problem when my wife constructed a shower bonnet affair with black light-tight material which slips onto the back of the camera after the holder is inserted. A 12 in. slit on one side is protected with a 3 in. wide flap. This allows for removing and re-inserting the dark slide and covers the film holder during exposure. I had tried to do this with the focusing cloth, but it is very heavy and weighs down the back of the camera, affecting alignment. Also I defy anyone to stay under a dark cloth and remove a 15 in. long dark slide when the back is placed vertically. One would have to be 9 feet tall. The bonnet is compact and easily placed over the camera backs. No more light leaks.
    PS Copyright is pending, and I made a bunch and will put them on e-bay. Bid to your hearts content. :-)



 

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