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  1. #1
    olleorama's Avatar
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    Horseman or Toyo?

    Looking to buy my first moonorail, my wooden budget field camera is fine, but lacks some adjustments.

    So looking in the used market for a while, and have come to the conclusions that Horseman LX or Toyo C or G seems to have everything I need/want. Application would be most things, were I want more resolution and more freedom to correct perspective than my Rb67 can provide. Hence, I should be able to lug it a few miles every now and then.

    Which would you choose, and why?

    I plan to use it with my three lenses, a 90, a 135 and a 210.

  2. #2
    CPorter's Avatar
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    I have the Horseman LE and find it to be very suitable to field application. As far as I know, the only difference between the LE and LX is the LX is yaw free. I can say that I've never had a field application that required a yaw free movement. This article should be of interest to you.

  3. #3
    olleorama's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPorter View Post
    I have the Horseman LE and find it to be very suitable to field application. As far as I know, the only difference between the LE and LX is the LX is yaw free. I can say that I've never had a field application that required a yaw free movement. This article should be of interest to you.
    I've read that article a few times

    The LX is a bit heavier than the LE, but I'm getting a sweet deal if I want with the LX and I haven't found any LEs at a good price. But it's reassuring to hear recommendations.

  4. #4

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    I have an LX45, and I hardly ever take it out into the field, although I intended to when I bought it. It is a great studio camera, but by the time I´ve carried it half a mile with lenses + paraphenalia I´m wondering why I´m so masochistic. :o It weighs a ton, and I haven´t found a rucksack big enough to hold it without taking the standards off the rail, which means the setup time gets longer.
    On the other hand, the movements can do everything (pretzelography ?) and it´s very well engineered so it´s easy to adjust exactly as you want.
    These days I mostly use mine for macro and take a 10x8 into the field - it´s easier to manage.

    Pete

  5. #5
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    The Horseman LX has base tilt to swing standards for yaw free tilt. It also has Main Frame Drive which provides Variable Axis Tilt on the film axis, along with Focus Plane Rise, which permits the back to be raised and lowered along the focal plane without disturbing focus.

  6. #6
    CPorter's Avatar
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    From the article I linked to above, a main reason that I chose to go with this camera for both field and inside use is the following:

    "The difference in set-up time between a monorail and a field camera is a small percentage of the total time required for any single shot."

    My set up time is less than three minutes while being cautious and moving with care. On many occasions, when I'm ready to move to another location, I leave the standards on the rail with the back and lens still attached (all movements securely tightened down), except that I close the bellows all the way in toward the center of the rail, wrap my dark cloth around the standards, being sure to cover the back and lens (with cap on), then move on. I rest the tripod on my shoulder and it is not a problem-------granted, not ideal, but then I do not want to sink money into multiple systems when I can have one system that comfortably allows me to function in both circumstances, indoor and outdoor. All I really need for a really good set up with this system is a wide angle lens, bag bellows, and I would like a slightly longer lens than my 210 that I have now. But my only lens at the moment, the 210, affords me many photographic opportunities, so I'm pretty happy.

    I don't know if the Toyo has zero detents, but if it does not, then IMO, you'll be happier with the Horseman.

  7. #7
    CPorter's Avatar
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    You may already have this page too, IDK.

    http://www.phootos.com/orphanFrame.h...m/monorail.htm


    I have the LE, but when I got it off ebay, it came with the LS expandable monorail. I would prefer the LE rail since it would be lighter.

  8. #8

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    Just to confuse you , why not a Sinar F. A very nice and stable camera. There are plenty of accessories available too whenever you feel the need for them. I havn't tried all monorail cameras, but out of the ones I've tried, the Sinar is definitely the easiest camera to work with (IMO).
    An older plain F shouldn't cost much money. There are more recent models, i.e. F1 and F2, which cost a bit more, but again are newer.

    //Björn

  9. #9
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edtbjon View Post
    Just to confuse you , why not a Sinar F. A very nice and stable camera. There are plenty of accessories available too whenever you feel the need for them. I havn't tried all monorail cameras, but out of the ones I've tried, the Sinar is definitely the easiest camera to work with (IMO).
    An older plain F shouldn't cost much money. There are more recent models, i.e. F1 and F2, which cost a bit more, but again are newer.

    //Björn
    Ditto. Sinars are pure joy and simplicity to use; especially the F. They arguably have the best quality as well. On top of it all, they travel better than either of the ones you mentioned, and will be not much, if any, more expensive; very likely even less expensive if you are patient and wait for a good deal. My Sinar F-1 actually weighs less than my Technika, and is limitless as far as movements. The advantages of the Tech are really just the rangefinder, the physically small package, and the speed of setup (not significantly shorter, however).
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 01-02-2010 at 04:38 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  10. #10
    olleorama's Avatar
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    Does the sinar F1 have geared movements?

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