Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,826   Posts: 1,582,036   Online: 802
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    36

    Sinar F or Linhof Technika

    Hi everybody

    I'm almost a newbie in LF. Ten years ago I used a Cambo in school, mainly for
    tableshots. My interest in LF is scenic shots, landscape. My interrogation is mainly concerned about the difference between field and view camera and why the Linhoff is so expensive. So, is it more convenient, for me, to pay less for a second hand Sinar F with more movement than a Technika? Probably, the focus is more easy to do with the Technika and a viewfinder but
    if I pay 10 times more.

    Any advise will be appreciated.

    Normand

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,482
    Images
    20
    A Technika is a more manageable camera in the field, though the F is designed to be transportable.

    For landscape you don't really need very extensive movements often, and the rangefinder on a Technika isn't that useful most of the time, except in low light where you might not really be sure what you're seeing on the groundglass. Why not just look for a wooden field camera that's easily transported in a backpack, has enough movement for your use, fits your budget, and is solid enough to do the job?
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #3
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,027
    Images
    1
    Linhof (assuming Master Technika line of cameras): you pay for the name mostly. Rolls Royce of field cameras IMO. superbly crafted. almost nothing will kill them. most rental houses rent boards on sinar or technika boards. rangefinder sucks from what I've found when using one. use the ground glass. get a brightscreen for it, makes a world of difference. stock screen is nice though. HEAVY for a field camera, but not as heavy as the F1/F2.

    Sinar F(F1/F2): great cameras, more suited to studio use(monorail). very well made, much cheaper on the used market these days. Accessories are everywhere. most rental houses have lenses on sinar boards. very nice system. you can use longer lenses(if that's your thing, or if you shoot 8x10, and want to use the same lenses for 4x5 as well). not very packable(size wise), but if you're only going say 100-300 yards from the car max(all the time). I'd go for the Sinar.

    just my $.02

    -Dan


  4. #4
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,482
    Images
    20
    The Technika rangefinder does what it's supposed to, if the lenses are cammed and infinity stops installed properly, and if the rangefinder has been calibrated recently. I use it quite often, but it isn't really needed in most landscape situations. If you want to be able to focus with a holder in the camera, darkslide pulled, and ready to shoot, groundglass focusing isn't an option, unless you have a sliding back, which is a lot more cumbersome than a rangefinder (I have one for my Sinar P).
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    135
    I am also new to large format, bought a crown graphic a couple of months ago for about US$ 175. The camera is fine for landscape use. I reversed the lens standard so now I have forward tilt without the need to drop the bed first. Easily done within 5 minutes.

    I don't see a reason to consider an expensive and heavy Linhof over the Crown Graphic or other field camera's. In my opinion it's better to invest the money in lenses and film.

    This week I bought a very nice Aero Ektar 7 inch lens for 55 euro so later this year I am going to get a Speed Graphic as well. These Graphics are truly excellent camera's.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Monterey Co, CA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    303
    The convenience of having a strongbox that your lens and bellows are safely stored inside, ready for more rapid deployment than other designs is why the press camera was the defacto standard of newspaper photographers for over half a century.

    Super Graphics, Wistas, and Meridians can do virtually anything and everything Technicas can, but do so at with far, far less expense.

  7. #7
    Bruce A Cahn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    43
    The Linhof (Master Technika Classic or 3000) is a lot more than the name. It is the best compact metal view camera ever made. The rangefinder works perfectly if it is set up right. The camera is quite steady hand held even down to 1/4 second, if you use the accessory grip. The Sinar F is an OK but way too bulky budget camera. If you are happy with the Sinar you can save a lot of money over either model Linhof MT currently made.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    The Linhof Technika's strongest suit, IMO, is hand held use. Other than that, with today's used market, the Sinar beats it dollar for dollar hands down. They are not hard to carry in a backpack, and definitely no problem "on location", when you can roll or carry the camera case from your vehicle to where you are shooting. Aside from the aforementioned hand holdability, they only really give up anything to the Linhof in terms of size and quickness of setup. Weight is about the same. (At just under 6 lbs., my Sinar F-1 sans lenses with a 12 inch rail is actually lighter than either of my Technika IIIs.) The Technika folds into a nice and compact "brick", while the Sinar is kind of gangly in comparison. Thus, it would seem that the Sinar is also more likely to get damaged from being backpacked, though I have had no problems.

    I suggest the F-1 or F-2 to start if what you want is a general-purpose camera similar in style to the Cambo you used to use. If it becomes cumbersome for "the field", there are many options for the field. The Technika is only one of them, and perhaps even one of the least preferable when compared to the many wooden field cameras that are available, as well as the other technical/press cameras that the fellow above mentioned. The Super Graphic is my personal favorite of the lot.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 01-19-2010 at 10:24 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  9. #9
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,640
    Images
    152
    Are you considering any wood field cameras? They are portable, light, have reasonable movements, and are beautiful (e.g. Tachihara, Wista, ShenHao, Chamonix,...). If you want a metal camera, there are also other less expensive choices like the Toyo. I've only played with a Linhof and it is wonderful, but not light.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    743
    Images
    28
    If you like the Technika, but not its price, you could look for an MPP Microtechnical Mk VII or Mk VIII. Very similar concept, still well made, but quite a bit cheaper.

    Like the Technika, there is a coupled-RF which uses interchangeable cams. Mine is accurate enough with the 150mm lens and matched cam.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin