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Thread: Lens hoods

  1. #21
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    It's those German brain surgeons Ralph

    As the lens is shifted (up, down, left or right)you are using light from a more oblique angle, almost as if using a much wider angle lens, so the edges of the lens hood on that are furthest from off centre is likely to vignette.

    In Krzys case that would probably happen rather quickly with his 50mm lens hood on the 150mm assuming it's not vignetting without movements.

    Ian
    Understood. Thanks.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
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  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Ian

    My fault, you are correct. I recently had my brain serviced, and I don't think they put it back together right. The equation, posted by myself earlier proves your point too.
    Hopefully you got a full 90 day guarantee for parts and labor?

    Sandy King

  3. #23
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    Hopefully you got a full 90 day guarantee for parts and labor?

    Sandy King
    No. The receipt said 'no fault found'.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
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  4. #24
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    No. The receipt said 'no fault found'.
    You should make claim then

  5. #25

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    Back to the OP's question. You should probably do alright, but with a view camera it's quite easy to check for vignetting yourself. It goes as follows, with a little bit of theory to start with:
    Start with a straight shot at infinity. Then the lens will be as close as possible to the film and thus the risk of vignetting will be the biggest. You don't say which camera you use, but at working aperture (typical f/22-f/32) check the corners of the ground glass. The best is if you have cut corners on your ground glass, but it will show on a ground glass without cut corners too. If there is any difference in what you see when the shade is on or off, you have problems. Try this again with maximum shift, but still at infinity. If in doubt, you can expose a couple (yes, only two) of sheets to make sure that you don't get vignetting, or if neccesary, maybe with one or two extra sheets decide when you need to take away your shade.
    Again, as there are so many different shades available, it's hard to say whether your particular shade will vignette or not and when it will do it.
    One thing is sure though, if the shade is safe at infinity it will be safe at any closer distance. It's all in the geometry of a camera.

    //Bj÷rn

  6. #26
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesper View Post
    Personally I use the darkslide to shade the lens since I have it in my hand during exposure anyway.
    This is good practice regardless even if you having a lens shade of some description.

    It helps to ensure that you have removed the Darkslide before "exposing" the film.

    Its amazing how many blank sheets of film you develop when you start LF - but the success rate goes up pretty fast

    Martin

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Krzys View Post
    I have a 52mm hood for 50mm lenses, 35mm format, which I want to fit on my Nikkor-W 150mm for 4x5. Am I right to assume that there will be no vignetting and that the two formats are compatible as they are the same focal length?
    This question doesn't mention anything about movements etc....So try your lens without a lens hood and then with and find out. If it doesn't then try and get it to i.e. stopped right down and with movements. Then find your limits.

    Cheers Dave

  8. #28
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Aislabie View Post
    This is good practice regardless even if you having a lens shade of some description.

    It helps to ensure that you have removed the Darkslide before "exposing" the film.

    Its amazing how many blank sheets of film you develop when you start LF - but the success rate goes up pretty fast

    Martin
    Of course when one does this, you can't see if the darkslide is in the image when the exposure is made, so it introduces the possibility for a new kind of error. Don't ask me how I know.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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