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  1. #1
    Jim Moore's Avatar
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    Advice on 8x10 Camera Purchase Requested

    Well, a little over a month ago I sold off my 4x5 system and lenses. Another one of those "I wish I hadn't of done that" deals.

    Anyway, I am wanting to replace it now because I miss it so much :rolleyes: and all of the threads on contact printing with AZO has me thinking about getting an 8x10 setup instead.

    I would like to purchase Used equipment and was hoping that the fine members of APUG could give me some suggestions on what to look for.

    I would like to stay under $2,000 if possible.

    Thanks!!

    Jim

  2. #2

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    Hi Jim,

    You have many fine 8x10 cameras to choose from.
    I myself use a 1890 ROC Carlton Camera that i found at a swap meet and it was too nice to pass up. I restored it and use it with joy. It folds up to be very similar to deardorff and other field cameras.

    Speaking of deardorffs they are nice cameras too if weren't abused. There are many on Ebay any time. Prices go around $1200 for nice condition ones and 800 900 for beat up ones.

    If campactness is not necessery, look for Kodak No2D camera in 8x10. They are very nice and functional.

    If you decide to buy new you have many options like wisner, tachihara, Shen hao, wista, canham, lotus gandolfi, ebony.
    I beleive tachihara and shen hao are reasonably priced and you can buy lenses film or film holders with the rest of your money.
    Dont go cheap on the tripod either.. you need a sturdy one.
    I personally use a surveyors tripod and am extremely happy with it. i got it for $90Cad.

    8x10 is great fun. you will love it

  3. #3

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    Jim
    My advice would be, for what its worth, get a goodish camera (good bellows, reasonably stable/tight standards) and invest in glass. If you had favorite 5x4 lenses, then get the equivants for 10x8, eg if you had a 150 and 240 get a 300 and a 480, or there abouts. Don't forget process or barrel lenses (no shutter) use the old hat trick and a ND filter.

    When I went to 10x8 I bought a Burke & James for $300 US, have since moved to a Kodak MasterView which I got for about $800 US (sold the B&J for about $280 so can't complain.) Still have my 5x4 gear plus I use reducing backs (5x7, 5x4,) if you want a bizarre look (have done this only once, whole series of circumstances) try 10x8 with a 5x4 reducing back and a 120 roll back!

    Other option is monorails (cheap, not so portable)

    Anyway, my 2 cents worth...
    David Boyce

    When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. Oscar Wilde Blog fp4.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    noseoil's Avatar
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    Used 8x10

    If you plan on doing any hiking at all, get a field camera. An old Deardorf is nice and relatively portable. Deniz is correct when she quotes prices. They work well and hold their value.

    I have an old Burke & James with the battleship gray paint and the red bellows. It is sturdy (robust might actually be a better word) and will last longer than I will, but it is not a joy to carry around. I've already made one trip to the chiropractor, so I have a helper or I don't take it out of the car for a walk. No problem shooting next to the car, but I don't drag it around in its little trunk with all the stuff inside by myself anymore. It does have a reducing back, so I can shoot 4x5 as well as 8x10. I've never tried 120 roll film, but come to think of it......

  5. #5
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Hi Jim,
    I got into 8x10 with a Deardorf, a Commercial Ektar lens, 8 holders, and a 4x5 reducing back for about $1200. Add in the Azo and amidol and it was still less than $2000.

    Its a real toss-up between the Masterview and a Deardorf. I consider them as equals in quality and design and about equal in price. There's a lot more 'Dorfs out there though, so they are easier to come by.

  6. #6

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    Tim- its "He" !!

    I have a 100+ years old B&L 360 or so mm lens on my camera that covers nice and suprisingly shutter works good too!

    Just the other day i decided to try my 210mm 6.3 commercial Komura on the 8x10 to see it covers and looks like it does! I got this lens for dirt cheap and its mounted in a copal 1 and its multicoated.
    they come on ebay everyonce in a while the look out for good deals.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by noseoil
    If you plan on doing any hiking at all, get a field camera.

    I have an old Burke & James with the battleship gray paint and the red bellows. It is sturdy (robust might actually be a better word) and will last longer than I will, but it is not a joy to carry around. It does have a reducing back, so I can shoot 4x5 as well as 8x10. I've never tried 120 roll film, but come to think of it......
    As the old saying goes "if its more than 50 feet from the car, it's not photogenic.."

    The roll film back one was kind of funny, wish I had a photo of us doing it.. Anyway, old grey B&J, 5x4 reducing back, one of those slip under the ground glass 6x12 holders and my 24 inch lens. You see, the photographer whos 6x12 back it was needed a long (read 24 inch) lens and, 1) he didn't have enough bellows draw, 2) try sticking a bloody great 24 inch artar on the front of a Horseman camera.... Worked well, he was happy, his client was more than happy, he got paid, we all had a laugh and I got a nice lunch.
    David Boyce

    When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. Oscar Wilde Blog fp4.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    bmac's Avatar
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    Jim,

    first of all, make sure you are buying it for the right reasons. Just so you know, the print you sent me for the prin exchange gets a lot of really good comments from people who swing by my cel.. er cubicle at work. You are doing great work with your medium format right now. ok ran over...

    In the past week I have dont close to what you are looking at doing.

    I found a Deardorff on eBay, got it for $610. Went to KEH.com and bought a used 305 G Claron for a tad over $600. Went to my local store to buy fixer, came out with a used Berlebach tripod and Ries head $179. Got some film holders from the APUG classifieds, and a local source $25-30 each. Moral of the story, if you are patient (and maybe lucky) there are great deals to be had. Oh yeah, Thanks YHOO

    If you do decide to get something other than a regular dorff, B&J, Masterview, make sure the back is actually an 8x10 back, my first one was about 5/8" oversized, so standard holders didnt fit right. And make sure you have enough bellows draw for the length of lenses you are most likely to use, otherwise you'll be up the same creek I was...

    Good luck!
    hi!

  9. #9

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    There have been some good advice in these responses. The best of which is make sure our going to 8x10 for the right reasons. Take some time and figure out what you want to do with your photography. What type of work your doing, what type of work you want to do, do you travel a lot, do you go back packing? All these things make a difference.

    Shooting 8x10 is a wonderful experience, but it is not for everyone. Its a lot of work and its not cheap. It will cause you to re-learn and refine some working habits. But seeing the negatives hanging after processing or seeing the finished contact prints usually makes me forget how much work the camera is to shoot.

    I will warn you that 8x10 will seem big at first and then you'll see a ULF negative or contact print and think the 8x10 is a little small. I know your working with a budget but a camera that is part of a system can save you money in the long run. My first 8x10 was a tachahara, I spent most of my starting budget on the glass. I worked with that camera for five years before I replaced it. I was able to figure out that I really enjoyed working with the 8x10 and making contact prints before spending more money on a better camera.
    George Losse
    www.georgelosse.com

  10. #10
    Ole
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    I just received mine yesterday

    Not really 8x10, but the European 18x24cm size. A German plate camera, with two double plate holders. Along with a 165mm Angulon (not Super), and about 100 sheets of "AGFA Gevarex Contone" 24x30cm film he sent along so I could try it.

    looking forward to having fun, and then hunting down a lens in the 400-600mm range.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

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