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  1. #11
    mobtown_4x5's Avatar
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    hey gang-

    just curious, would glass plates have any noticable difference/improvement vs film?

    Matt

  2. #12

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    To me they seem sharper......but not 100% more sharp...I am sticking with my $1 per neg film...

  3. #13

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    just a guess, but film flatness would not be an issue. Plates cracking would, however. I suppose it might just be for the sake of using that old camera that has been lying around... I dunno.
    EDIT:

    Ok, Jorge beat me to it. take his word over mine.

  4. #14

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    Hmmmm..I've got and old 5x8 camera with 6 holders that takes glass plates....

  5. #15
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    LOL!
    hi!

  6. #16
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    One nice thing about being nosey and checking out people's websites as they join, you remember interesting members and their work. This web site of one of our members might be of interest to you on this thread.

    http://www.samackenna.demon.co.uk/samackenna.html

  7. #17

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    I think that it may be worth mentioning at this point that a consideration I would entertain is the T distance of the plate holder as compared to the T distance of the camera. All of the flatness in the world won't amount to much if the point of focus/exposure disagree.

  8. #18

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    I have asked about 1.16th, but maybe if I try a bit harder I can get a result. Jorge has informed me that Mexico, which is only an hour away, uses 2mm as their standard just like the UK and Canada. So I may be heading down there.

    Ummm...anyone know the Spanish word for 'glazier'?

    As far as I know, the T-distance is pretty much the same. Plates were used until pretty recently. You can even buy a film/plate holder for the old Mamiyaflex and Rolleis. Plus, many people still work in this method.

    Ironically all I want is the LOOK of the glass plate. That old orthochromatic look with a LONG exposure time that slightly softens the subject.

    I am wondering....If I took some old, unexposed SHEET film, processed it, and THEN coated it with Liquid Light, would that work? I know some people use Liquid Light on unexposed, but developed, PAPER. In theory I'm thinking it should work.
    Official Photo.net Villain
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  9. #19
    lee
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    Robert,
    I don't know the word for glazier but glass is "cristal". You might try to use that.

    lee\c

  10. #20

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    robert -

    why don't you just expose paper instead of glass?
    you won't really be able to make enlargements too well with it, but you can make good contact prints, and if you bees-wax it ( fiber paper), you will less of an exposure time when making the prints.

    the main difference you will see if you are shooting paper rather than liquid light'ed sheets of glass is the imperfections in the glass, imperfections in your coating process, and the layer of texture and depth glass offers if you make enlarged prints from them. liquid light is a silver bromide emulsion and paper might not necessarily be silver bromide, but they are ortho, and about asa 6.

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