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  1. #21

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    See, I will be enlarging it. Mylar sounds good. Never thought of that. I might get some tonight.
    Official Photo.net Villain
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    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  2. #22

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    robert

    with mylar, put a nice layer of binding agent ( gelatine ) as you would with glass. otherwise, the emulsion won't have anything to anchor onto, and it'll slide down the drain once it is wet/swollen and you are processing it.

    if your enlarger is bright enough, you might be able to coat waxed paper and get a good image as well
    Last edited by jnanian; 07-15-2004 at 10:00 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: forgot a word :)

  3. #23
    fingel's Avatar
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    I still think if all you want is an old time ortho look, why hassle with coating mylar or unexposed sheet film with liquid light when you can buy it already made for you. Here is a shot made on Ilford Ortho Plus. I rated it at ASA 25, and souped it in D-76 1:1 under a red safelight. A box of 4x5 (25 sheets) is $16.50 from B&H. To me it is more economical in time and money to just buy the film. That's my 2 cents.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails ilford ortho.jpg  
    Scott Stadler

  4. #24
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    Kodak professional copy film is Ortho Also. Only thing I don't like about it is its pretty grainy for an EI25 film. How is the Ilford for grain?
    Gary Beasley

  5. #25

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    Well, this is mainly for portraiture, and I WANT that old look.

    Which is why 25 is WAAAAY too fast for me. I need an ASA of 1/2 or 1.

    Why? If you notice on a lot of old portraits, the features are very soft. Some of this is the lens, but a lot of it is from the exposure times. I've seen work done with nice, clean modern Rodenstocks on plates that is very soft. Mainly because the model is holding for 1 or 2 seconds. Which gives just enough blur to really make it interesting. Plus the DOF is pretty shallow since you are almost always wide open.

    Now, I COULD do this with Ilford Ortho, but I am not inclined to carry around that many ND filters.
    Official Photo.net Villain
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    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    The price they're looking at is:
    13x18cm 6 per box £55.32
    5x4" 25 per box £149.00
    9x12cm 6 per box £40.00
    Is that all? They're giving them away...

    sarcasm mode:off
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  7. #27
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Kennedy
    Well, this is mainly for portraiture, and I WANT that old look.

    Which is why 25 is WAAAAY too fast for me. I need an ASA of 1/2 or 1.

    Why? If you notice on a lot of old portraits, the features are very soft. Some of this is the lens, but a lot of it is from the exposure times. I've seen work done with nice, clean modern Rodenstocks on plates that is very soft. Mainly because the model is holding for 1 or 2 seconds. Which gives just enough blur to really make it interesting. Plus the DOF is pretty shallow since you are almost always wide open.

    Now, I COULD do this with Ilford Ortho, but I am not inclined to carry around that many ND filters.
    You could always turn out the lights and shoot in the dark by the glow of the nightlight.
    Gary Beasley

  8. #28

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    Yeah, but it makes the models REALLY nervous....
    Official Photo.net Villain
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    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  9. #29
    Ole
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    Well, I've ordered a few plates to try out... Since they didn't have 9x12cm this time around, I ordered two boxed of 13x18cm. They'll probably be used in the 18x24cm camera, with "format adapters".

    I'll let you know what they look like
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

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