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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by mobtown_4x5
    To me the overwhelming majority of time is spent setting up and composing/focussing a scene, it only takes another second (or in my case, usually 5-30 seconds!) to expose the other side of the holder.
    Hi Matt, what I like to do, if I can, is to scan my surroundings so that wherever I set up there is a second scene waiting around me, either by moving the whole tripod a bit or simply panning left or right. I agree about set up versus exposing the second sheet - a pain I know. But there is a certain satisfaction in knowing that all you need is one (plus money savings too of course), ceteris paribus naturally. So look around before setting up, try and find TWO shots to make. Helps ease the back pain.
    Francesco

  2. #12
    Shesh's Avatar
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    Being new to LF, I expose around 3-4 negatives per scene. Although, I vary the exposures, so strictly speaking they are not identical. I hope that soon I will get confident enough to bring it down to 2.
    Cheers, Shesh

    Not to know what happened before one was born is always to be a child - Cicero

  3. #13

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    I shoot two of each setup. I'm relatively confident of my exposures, so I develop one shot in a Jobo at my best guess for development time. I use the second shot to alter development time as required if my initial estimate is wrong. If my development time is correct for the first shot, I develop the second identically and then check for dustspots, etc. to determine which I'll print. I agree that, at least for black and white, film is a relatively minor expense.

    David, enjoyed your post about your shooting available light stage shots with your technica, I suppose you shoot landscapes with a Leica and an f1 Noctilux?

  4. #14
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    The best camera is the one in your hand (my sister is the sharp one in the attached photo).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Candy,JustUsLeague1,May2004.jpg  
    Last edited by David A. Goldfarb; 07-19-2004 at 01:54 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15
    DrPhil's Avatar
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    Well, it depends. With chromes, I almost always bracket. With B&W it just depends on my perception of the contrast. Often I will shoot both sides and change the developing (e.g. N and N-1). With chromes it is not unusual for me to play with filters though. Sometimes I'll shoot a scene with and without a filter. If I do this I usully don't bracket. However, if it is a scene that I can't replace (trip of a lifetime) then I will shoot as many as I need to ensure a successful image. This adds up to a lot of film though. I'm getting ready to go to the tetons and glacier NP for 17 days. I'm taking 700 sheets of transparency film and another 200 sheets of B&W. The Jobo will get a workout when I get home!

  6. #16
    papagene's Avatar
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    I usually shoot two, sometimes varying exposure slightly. It's just the way I like to work.
    gene
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    "I don't care about Milwaukee or Chicago." - Yvon LeBlanc

  7. #17
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Dr Phil
    7 or 8 years ago I took 3 weeks off in July and August and did both Glacier and the Tetons -- It was great! If you find the pole bridge bar on the edge of Glacier have a pint for me!

    jdc
    Quote Originally Posted by DrPhil
    Well, it depends. With chromes, I almost always bracket. With B&W it just depends on my perception of the contrast. Often I will shoot both sides and change the developing (e.g. N and N-1). With chromes it is not unusual for me to play with filters though. Sometimes I'll shoot a scene with and without a filter. If I do this I usully don't bracket. However, if it is a scene that I can't replace (trip of a lifetime) then I will shoot as many as I need to ensure a successful image. This adds up to a lot of film though. I'm getting ready to go to the tetons and glacier NP for 17 days. I'm taking 700 sheets of transparency film and another 200 sheets of B&W. The Jobo will get a workout when I get home!

    *

  8. #18
    Mateo's Avatar
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    I only shoot one shot per scene. When I first started out I decided that if the mistakes didn't hurt, I wouldn't learn from them. When I did my first commercial shoot the marketing director was a bit alarmed by this but I got a year's worth of steady work because I nailed every shot. Boy am I cocky, no I just want to show a different way of looking at it.

  9. #19

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    My thing is that I feel comfortable to just shoot one and move but I had a few times where there was dust in one and if I didnt have the second neg I woudl have lost the shot. I guess if I was shooing 8x10 just do one and move on but 4x5 isnt very expensive so I just shoot a dupe. Maybe I am wrong for doing it like that. Heck I dont know but for now I guess I will do the dupe thing until I can feel better about no dust when loading the holders.

    Thank you all again,

    Kev

  10. #20

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    Kevin,

    I'm not a negative kind of guy (I like the sound of that) and use a method passed along years ago by Pat Ohara. You may not even be able to get the film you use in a Readyload or Quikload sleeve, but for what it is worth, this is how I go about it.

    Using QuickLoad film, make three exposures at the same settings. Each of the three film sleeves is marked the same way, to indicate exposure, filtering, compostion. On a day where I create twelve unique images, that means 36 exposures.

    When I get home I log the exposures in the order that I took them, numbering each in sequence. (Some folks number and letter such as #121-A, #121-B, #121-C but I've found just sequential numbering works just as well). Then I take one from each set of three frames (say frame A) to the lab to be processed normally.

    Since some compositions are only slight variations on a theme, the lab needs to "twin check" the film with a pair of identical numbers (one on the film, one on the sleeve) in order to keep the film organized. That means in addition to my film, I get my sleeves back so I can match my notes to a particular image.

    I then evaluate the exposed film. If it is off, I make an adjustment to the processing instructions for that image and send in the second (frame B) of the set. And so on.

    If I get it right the first time, I have three well-exposed duplicate images. If I miss on the first frame, I have two more chances to get it right.

    This is one of the real advantages to using single pieces of film, vs. a roll, and the reason I typically use the Quikloads (which are heavier) instead of loading my own film.

    Seems to me someone had a thread on here recently that compared the weight of Quikloads to Graphmatic backs if you are wondering about weight.

    Cost-wise, Quikloads are pricey, but what is your time worth? Certainly, the dust factor should improve with Quikloads.

    Hope this helps.


    --Keith S. Walklet, 2004-06-08 17:51:26

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