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  1. #1

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    Question on your method of shooting LF.

    Do you take just one shot per side of your 4x5 holder or take the same shot a secong time for insurance. I have been doing the same shot per holder just for insurance. Just was wondering what others do?

    Kev

  2. #2
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjsphoto
    Do you take just one shot per side of your 4x5 holder or take the same shot a secong time for insurance. I have been doing the same shot per holder just for insurance. Just was wondering what others do?

    Kev
    Neg film...
    When shooting for a purpose (as in being paid) I shoot the same shot on both sides and develope them separately. I learned this from a pro and it has saved his butt and mine many times. When shooting an extra shot or for pleasure I may use the 'extra' for bracketing or a slightly different angle.

    Tranies..
    This is a whole different story. After taking a polaroids and being fairly confident of my exposure I will take at least 3 sets of two. One set on the the polaroid time, a set a 1/3 - 1/2 stop below and a set a 1/3 - 1/2 above. Sometimes I will bracket in only one direction (over or generally under) if my faith in the polaroid is suspect or experience tells me the shot may require it.

    For me tranies can get expensive.
    Besides avoiding risk from development failure the multiple exposures at the same settings allows you the hope of having a neg without a hair or dust in a critical area.

    *

  3. #3

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    THanks for the response. I started doign this after I screed myself as I loaded the wrong film in the holder. Luckily that day I took 2 shots and I was able to pull the neg out after I saw the frist one. Looks like I will continue down this road.

    Thanks again,

    Kev

  4. #4

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    I shoot one sheet per scene...NOW. When I made the switch to Efke and Pyrocat I would shoot two shots even four shots per scene in order to get a handle on the correct exposure-development time combination for printing on AZO paper. This lasted about 6 months. It is of course the safer path to double up or bracket. But if you take a lot of shots, esepcially with 8x10 or bigger, then it is wise to try and conserve film as I believe that the probability in finding a keeper when exposing 50 scenes per box is higher than when exposing 25 scenes per box.
    Francesco

  5. #5

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    I, like Francesco, take one shot per scene. I have doubled up when testing film, but tire of that quickly as it is a waste of film IMO. I have screwed up shots before and wished I had a backup, but not enough to warrant the waste of film & money.

  6. #6

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    I almost always take two exposures per scene with 4x5 and 8x10. I develop one sheet of the scene with sheets requiring similar development. Then if I feel I could improve the neg by altering developing time I have that option. otherwise I just have one in case the other gets scratched or damaged.

    In 11x14 I try to make only one exposure if only because of the price of film. But if the scene is questionable I may make two different exposures.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  7. #7

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    Kevin,

    I usually only shoot a second negative of the set up if something might have moved in the first shot. Meaning the wind is blowing a branch or something like that.

    I do shoot two exposures if I'm testing a new film. I'll load one type of film on one side of the holder and the new film on the second and shoot both sides of the same camera setup.

    If I'm shooting people, I do use the same set up for a number of shots. But with photographing people with LF, each exposure is a different moment in time, and the people are never exactly the same, not like like a building or landscape would be.
    George Losse
    www.georgelosse.com

  8. #8
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    I always shoot two. Trying to save money on film is false economy in my opinion. For money shoots I do what Mr.Callow does and develop them seperately, just in case.
    www.ericrose.com
    yourbaddog.com

    "civility is not a sign of weakness" JFK

    "The Dude abides" - the Dude

  9. #9
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    It depends.

    With B&W I'll take a second shot if I'm unsure how much contrast I'll want in the final version, but this is pretty rare. With color transparencies I'll sometimes bracket 1/3 stop (usually down), because small adjustments can make a big difference in tonality. With portraits and moving subjects I'll always do several, because there are more things that are hard to predict--eyes closed, excessive subject movement, something out of place, etc.

    Recently I was shooting some improv comedy on stage--low light at about 1/15 sec, f:4.5, handheld with the Linhof, rangefinder focusing, and Grafmatics. I just treated it like bird photography--lots of extras, since many shots will be screwed up by inaccurate focus, camera movement, and subject movement. Looking at the negs, I found that my focus was usually accurate and the camera was pretty steady at that speed, but subject movement was the biggest issue, sometimes detracting and sometimes adding interest. One keeper is worth ten throwaways in that situation.

  10. #10
    mobtown_4x5's Avatar
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    I am still basically in a "test" type mode, learning to meter and expose with confidence in a variety of situations.

    So for now, I am exposing 4 or more sheets per scene, varying exposure, DOF, ect... to try and learn to visualize with my materials.

    As I get better, I hope to eliminate "bracketing", and simply expose the scene with confidence.

    However, I will still always do 2 shots for the possibility of dust, scratch, subject movement, etc as others have stated. Plus it's just convienient because of the double holders. To me the overwhelming majority of time is spent setting up and composing/focussing a scene, it only takes another second (or in my case, usually 5-30 seconds!) to expose the other side of the holder.

    Matt

    Matt

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