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  1. #11

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    Who on earth would throw that in a skip?!!!!!

    Looks complete and with a bit of servicing quite probably very usable.

    I recognise the tripod, I have one just the same, ex- military surplus. Using that as a size guide the camera must be pretty big. I'm guessing wholeplate? (6.5 by 8.5 inch plates?)

    If you don't want it get it on eebeegeebeebay.... got to be good for a few pennies.

    Well saved, that man
    Steve

  2. #12
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Looks like a good cleaning and CLA would put it serviceable. Definitely not one for the bin.

  3. #13
    Martin Reed's Avatar
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    That brings back memories - I once worked in Harringay Photographic, in North London, which dealt extensively in ex-government cameras, Williamson was the principal make of aerial camera we had through, but I only remember seeing one of these Williamson view cameras, so they're pretty thin on the ground.

    From my memories of handling the camera it was a pretty nasty experience, very heavy, & limited movements. Not much fun in the field, but it would still make a good static portrait camera. However well worth preserving and belongs in a collection somewhere.

    The format will be whole-plate, 6.5x8.5", still a standard size on the Ilford ULF cutting program.

  4. #14
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Harringay Photographic, AW Young and Marston & Heard, were all great shops, Aladdin's dens of equipment, film, paper, and obscure photographic items. It's a real shame there's nowhere like them now.

    Odd to think I might have bumped into you way back then Martin

    Many of us cut our teeth with ex Government films and papers from those stores, I even bought FP3 although it was a bit long in the tooth, but OK

    Ian

  5. #15
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Great find. Now go back there and find one for me!

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #16
    Martin Reed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Harringay Photographic, AW Young and Marston & Heard, were all great shops, Aladdin's dens of equipment, film, paper, and obscure photographic items. It's a real shame there's nowhere like them now.

    Odd to think I might have bumped into you way back then Martin

    Ian
    Well, there are still the linear descendants of Harringay Photographic. The history in as few sentences as possible; Harringay Photo was set up after WW2 by Frank Knichel in partnership with Harry Madden, trading extensively on the massive amount of photo equipment & materials coming ex-government. This golden goose stopped delivering the eggs in the mid 70's, and the partners were retiring age so Harringay Photo was sold to the 'Phototec' setup - it didn't last long after that. Phototec was the umbrella company that had been created to encompass A W Young, Marston & Heard etc, but the company was expanding just as the hobbyist market was changing direction & soon had to downsize quickly.

    My boss when I was at Harringay before the sale was Roy Knichel, Frank's son, & when the firm was sold he set up RK Photographic, now in Potters Bar & still a firm part of the photo establishment.

    I had decamped to Goldfinger in Muswell Hill, and that being something of a one-trick pony setup dependent on Agfa material had it's meeting with destiny in due course. After that I started Silverprint aiming to keep the base as broad as possible & have managed to survive quarter of a century since then. So there's still me & Roy trying to keep some of that flavour going. But I know what you mean about the ex-gov shops of that time, it was what got so many people started in photography. Brunnings in Holborn was another great old shop finishing around that time, a photo punters paradise.

  7. #17

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    I remember Harringay Photographic. In 1969 I bought a Ross Xpres 6" f4 Wide Angle lens, brand new for £15. I still have the lens and it is fitted on my recently completed 5" x 7" camera. It is very sharp but a bit low in contrast.
    Happy days!

  8. #18

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    I mean it is very sharp but low in contrast!

  9. #19
    Martin Reed's Avatar
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    No multicoating back then - single coating if you were lucky!

    What interests me about that sort of setup like Harringay was the way specialist activities had sprawled out to encompass every conceivable way of extracting cash out of what arrived on the van from the photo auctions. It was like nothing on the carcass was wasted. There were 2 in house engineers to turn equipment around - bulk film would be spooled down into smaller lengths - roll paper would be sheeted & then cut to various sheet sizes. 16mm film would have extra sprockets cut so that it could be sold as standard 8mm. It was all stale, I should point out! But there was hardly ever a complaint.

    The premises had grown organically so that they occupied about 10,000 sq feet spread through adjacent shops & alleys. And the whole setup, which was probably quite like similar enterprises back into Victorian times, became financially unsound within a short space of a few years, a great reminder how quickly situations can change in photography.

  10. #20

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    Mike, hi, what's the lens on this rescued beast of your's please?

    fairly common, the 'AM' logo, it was stamped on plenty of Ross lenses at that time


    andrew

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