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  1. #21
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Down the years I've collected a bagful of meters for still and movie work. Here are my brief opinions on a few of them.

    I have the L508C and use it with the Minolta Booster II - they are compatible. The only thing I don't like about it is the lack of readout in the viewfinder, otherwise it is a great all-round meter. I believe that the newer versions have a viewfinder display.

    I also have the Minolta Spotmeter F and the Pentax Digital. The Pentax is good and simple. The Minolta is versatile, and it has the most useful (to me) viewfinder display. It's the one I trust the least in low light (I wonder if it is over-sensitive to IR).

    I love the Sekonic Studio Master if there is enough light, and I usually use it with the Minolta Spotmeter in preference to my Spectra. The direct reading slides are neat.

    Best,
    Helen
    Last edited by Helen B; 07-31-2004 at 12:27 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22

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    Sekonic l-508, not especially compact but water resistant & pretty durable.

  3. #23

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    The Sekonic L-508, which is really two meters in one, one incident the other a spotmeter adjustable from 1 to 4 degrees, is really hard to beat, and the fact that uses commonly available AA batteries is a real advantage.

    However, persons interested in doing traditional zone type photograhy might want to consider one of the meters that will allow puting a functional zone scale on the meter. You can not do this with most modern digital meters, including the L-508.

    I generally prefer to meter by taking incident readings and I use the L-508 but there are times when I still do zone readings and in those cases I find the visual scale on my Pentax 1 degree spotmeter to be very useful.

    Sandy King

  4. #24

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    I've heard a lot of good things about the Pentax Digital Spotmeter, especially the Zone IV version. However, I shoot lots of chrome too (in addition to B&W) so I opted for a lightly used Minolta Spotmeter IV. I've had it for about a year and a half, and love it. It's never let me down, and is still on its first set of batteries - after a year and a half of use, and many hours/days of inadvertantly being left on. The readings are dead on as far as I'm concerned, and it agrees with my other meter (a tiny pocketsize Sekonic L-308) and my eye.

    It has memory and a whole slew of other features that most people never use (like averaging), a backlight (a good idea) and perhaps best, it hasn't had flash sync problems with amy of my flashes or cables. And can take the 60+ V from my Black Line packs.
    -Jason Antman

    "There is nothing worse than a sharp photograph of a fuzzy concept." - A. A.

  5. #25
    edz
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B
    I love the Sekonic Studio Master if there is enough light, and I usually use it with the Minolta Spotmeter in preference to my Spectra. The direct reading slides are neat.
    Why? I'm not quite sure which Spectra you have but I can't see an advantage to the Sekonic over any of the Spectras. More related to the Norwood design (and Sekonic Studio) is/was their Combi-II which, although out of production (replaced by the digital IV series of meters), is still, I think, among the nicest analog battery driven light meter ever made. It even has the possibility to have an average metering of both incident and reflected light. Its needs, like most modern meters, a battery--- even the Spectra Combi-500 needed a battery for low light levels-- but is relatively flexible in its selection. Spot meters have been quite hip over the last 30 years or so--- and all of the Spectras have had some form of accessory to convert them for Spot use--- but I've hardly noticed ever the need, especially in still work, for spot meters. And even for "zone stuff", since we are talking here about large format cameras I'd suggest instead of spot one would be better served by ground glass metering--- again something the Spectras can do quite well.
    Edward C. Zimmermann
    BSn R&D // http://www.nonmonotonic.net

  6. #26
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Hi Ed,

    My answer is going to be unworthy of your well-reasoned question! My preference for the Studio is mainly an unreasonable preference that I don't have to justify to anybody but myself. I just like it. I like the simplicity, lack of unnecessary precision (for the purpose I'm using it for), size and directness.

    I agree that, if based purely on reasonable reasons, I would use one of my Spectra meters: the IV-A is my most recent aquisition, and I have an older Classic of some kind - which I am also very fond of and have used for twenty years maybe. I'm never sure how much I should reveal of my mental abberations - one of which is having unnatural quantities of exposure meters. It probably comes from not being bitten by a bat while using an SEI in some abandoned tunnels under Newcastle thirty years ago.

    As I said in my original post, I work in both stills and movies, so my comments were not just referring to LF work.

    So there it is. I don't really know 'why' either.

    Best,
    Helen

  7. #27
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    Pentax digital spot meter color correct by Zone VI. You can purchase from Calumet. I've used one for MANY year with no problems. Don't believe the thread you may have read about the accuracy of the color correction where you are then able to read the light intensity through your filters. Perhaps, one exception might be Green.

  8. #28

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    Up grade to a Weston Master IV! I still use mine. I also use a Weston Ranger 9 modified to take silver button batteries. For low night photography I did break down and buy a Gossen Luna Pro F---very accurate but lot$ of buck$---unless you really need the capabillities go with the Weston. They not only do the job but they give other photographers something to talk about when you're not around!

  9. #29
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    I use a 508 in the studio or outdoors with flash but I have become a real zone freak. I live by my Zone VI pentax digital for B&W.
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by clogz
    I have got the Minolta VF with spot attachment and I must say it is very accurate and can measure both ambient and flashlight.
    Hans
    Me too

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