Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,536   Posts: 1,544,112   Online: 986
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 39 of 39
  1. #31
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,648
    Images
    40
    "...my dog was snoozing in a doorway..."
    I thought you had captured a rare hairy hippopotamus! Surreal, yes...
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  2. #32
    mhcfires's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    El Cajon, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    552
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    I thought you had captured a rare hairy hippopotamus! Surreal, yes...
    Hairy Hippo?? My little Scottish Terror would consider that statement an insult!
    Michael Cienfuegos


    If you don't want to stand behind our troops, please feel free to stand in front of them.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    To be fair, he does look like a hairy hippo.

    But back to the process: does using jello bleach not require more of it, and make more of a mess than if you would submerge the negative in liquid bleach in a tray?

  4. #34
    mhcfires's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    El Cajon, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    552
    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    To be fair, he does look like a hairy hippo.

    But back to the process: does using jello bleach not require more of it, and make more of a mess than if you would submerge the negative in liquid bleach in a tray?
    The gel is better, you DON'T want to submerge the photo, if you get bleach on the emulsion you will ruin it. The popular method is to tape the negative emulsion side down to a glass plate and pour the bleach over the film and let it soften the black backing. The gel is nice, you can work over a folded newspaper and do the job without spilling bleach all over the place. I blot the gel and the softened backing off with paper towels, then rinse under water to wash the negative before hanging it up to dry. Probably wouldn't hurt to use some photo-flo, but I was too lazy to run that step.
    Michael Cienfuegos


    If you don't want to stand behind our troops, please feel free to stand in front of them.

  5. #35
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,720
    Images
    23
    To add to the magic of Polaroid, a teacher of mine was a chemist at Polaroid. It only adds to the magic now. Long live the instant!
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by mhcfires View Post
    The gel is better, you DON'T want to submerge the photo, if you get bleach on the emulsion you will ruin it. The popular method is to tape the negative emulsion side down to a glass plate and pour the bleach over the film and let it soften the black backing. The gel is nice, you can work over a folded newspaper and do the job without spilling bleach all over the place. I blot the gel and the softened backing off with paper towels, then rinse under water to wash the negative before hanging it up to dry. Probably wouldn't hurt to use some photo-flo, but I was too lazy to run that step.
    Thanks for that!
    Good thing i don't have some film yet. Else i would have found out in a rather more unpleasant way.

  7. #37
    mhcfires's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    El Cajon, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    552
    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Thanks for that!
    Good thing i don't have some film yet. Else i would have found out in a rather more unpleasant way.
    Glad to help. This stuff isn't exactly cheap, don't want to ruin it all on the first try. Be sure to wear latex or vinyl gloves, the bleach is very hard on the skin.
    Last edited by mhcfires; 09-09-2010 at 05:20 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Spelling!
    Michael Cienfuegos


    If you don't want to stand behind our troops, please feel free to stand in front of them.

  8. #38
    jp498's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,467
    Images
    74
    Though someone compared the fuji fp100c45 with tmy2, they didn't add in the cost of developing and printing the tmy2. It's easily equal in cost. (And far cheaper to do the instant compared to purchasing commercial processing, which probably very few of us do)

    I've mostly stuck to film for B&W and digital for color. There are two nice exceptions though. Lifepixel IR converted DSLR for infrared B&W, and Fuji instant 4x5 for color.

    For the instant color, one technical advantage is to be able to easily verify the DOF in a shot. That's something you can't so easily see on a groundglass; sort of the transmitive versus reflective thing I think. Nothing beats a hard print.

    Even if you have no good technical reason, people love it. If you photograph people, it's a little piece of magic. Normally with film, it's "good job, thanks, you'll see the pix in a couple weeks at double-u, double-u, double-u dot... or I'll send you a print after I get around to it." With instant, the 2 minutes or so "developing" are the slowest 2 minutes of someone's life, slower than holding your breath underwater. Peel it apart, and you've got a glistening beautiful color print that really is something special. The subject absolutely must have that photo to keep. It's the magic of film processing simplified and mixed with instant gratification; it cheapens digital.


  9. #39

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    108
    I have so many reasons I like instant photos: In camera building, it is a great way to test for light leaks which is what I did yesterday on an 8x10 camera. For street photography, it's just more social, as Aaron says. I got my J-66 in the 60s and have been instantly imaging ever since. The appeal of a good image on paper has never left me. Having that available at the time of exposure is magic. On any Speed Graphic, my primary camera, a first exposure with FP-100B45 as a test has sometimes been the only exposure I needed. I found out right away. Instant film is easy to experiment with and provides a lot of artistic possibilities, and I can leave my computer off. It's a thrill to see the image.

    Electronically mediated instant imaging on paper will eventually be perfected, and I will use that. Zink doesn't make it, yet, but in the future it might. The ability to expose on a surface, and have that surface be the image, still cannot be beat.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin