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  1. #11
    Mal
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    In relation to ZoneVI's comment... "If you are scanning and editing your images in Photo Shop CS5, you can always choose to apply your filters during that process."

    This may work with colour filters but I can't see it working with neutral density filters. A graduated ND filter helps to balance the exposure of the sky with the land (for example). If the sky is blown by correctly exposing the land you'll never get back the details in post production... Using ND filters to take longer exposures of waterfalls, etc is also something that would be hard to replicate in Photoshop...

    A filter kit is worth the research and investment for me...

  2. #12

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    I think its only fair that I respond to the last two comments. First I do not think I said that the filters that can be used in post processing are the catch all end all just as filters used on a lens while creating an image are not the catch all end all.

    Either way, and no matter what method you use, there is no substitute for a properly exposed negative.

    The comments in regard to my post make me wonder if the individuals that posted them have ever attempted to apply filters to a scanned black and white negative when post processing in Photo Shop. It is possible to apply different filters to different parts of that negative through the use of layers. That is something that would be difficult to do with a traditional filter system.

    A blown out sky is a blown out sky. There is no disagreement there. You certainly can blow out parts of a scene whether you shoot film or digital. Yes you can always use a neutral density filter, or maybe the scene could have possibly been metered differently to begin with. I am not suggesting that traditional filters do not have a place, but I am saying there is some alternative that is applicable when post processing in photo shop. Its certainly not perfect, but then the process of taking the image isn't always perfect and neither is the wet dark room post processing. If it was we would have never needed the ability to bracket and use exposure compensation.

    Interestingly enough, I think there are plenty of photographers that certainly have some afterthoughts concerning images they have made and possibly filters they wish that had applied when exposing their negatives. All I have done as far as I can tell is suggest some alternative methodology to those that might be open minded enough to take an opportunity to explore it.

    Just as an example of how to apply a neutral density filter, I am adding a link for those who are interested. While it does not really apply to a blown out sky specifically, it does address the methodology with instruction for those who might be interested.

    http://www.turningturnip.co.uk/photo...-in-photoshop/


    Also the same HDR method used for digital can be applied to scanned film. Its worth exploring.

    Jason
    Last edited by ZoneVI; 09-19-2010 at 11:50 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: To add a link

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