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  1. #11
    FiatluX's Avatar
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    Good price, buy it!

  2. #12

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    Here is the version information:

    http://www.cameraquest.com/techs.htm

    Cheers, Steve

  3. #13

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    I have two Tech. IIIs, and I love them.

    For most things other than studio work or other close-up work, it is probably not the movements on the camera that will limit you, but the lenses that come with it. It's a capable camera for many things, but those particular lenses limit you quite a lot. They are designed for shooting hand held straight on or with very minimal movements. To get the most of what the camera can do on a tripod, you need lenses that are designed to allow more movement.

    What the seller is saying about the numbers matching only affects you if you want to shoot hand held, and even then, it is possible that you will be "close enough" in some applications. The matching numbers ensure proper focus with the rangefinder. Hopefully the 240 is numbers matched to the cam and camera body.

    Oh yeah. Matching numbers also affect market value somewhat significantly. Buyers know that these cameras need numbers-matched parts to be usable hand held, and they will pay a premium for this.

    These cameras are compact, but they are far from light. They weigh 6 to 8 pounds, depending on what you have mounted to them lens wise and back wise. My SINAR F1 monorail with 12 inch rail, rail clamp, DB shutter, and 210 f/5.6 lens weighs about seven, and it has every movement under the sun, and is actually fairly easy to backpack with. The advantages of the Linhof are only that it is compact, and that it is quick to set up, not to mention the obvious fact that the SINAR is not hand holdable.

    There were five versions of the Tech. III, and only the last two have the dropping bed, which gives you the ability to employ front forward tilt. MAKE SURE you have this if you have this if any intentions to use front tilt, or to use a 90mm lens in vertical orientation without taking a picture of the end of the bed.

    The rear movements are 15 degrees any way you want.

    If the camera is in very good shape, I think $550 is about right or maybe a bit high, personally. Maybe I am lucky, but I got two incredibly clean, original owner kits with six lenses (three each, every single one of them number matched to the original camera, with the proper cams), tons of accessories (including a roll film back and an optical zoom finder, a custom fit case for one of the kits, four Linhof Deluxe film holder, and 13 standard film holders in like new condition) for $1650 total. These are really collector-quality cameras the way they came, and I feel that I got a lot for what I paid. Strangely enough, they both fell my way within a matter of months of each other.

    One thing to watch out for is the bellows. They are old for a flexible leather item (55 years old, at a minimum, unless they have been replaced at some point). Leaks are often a problem, and replacing them AIN'T CHEAP AT ALL!

    I think it is a great camera for most things. It is versatile, compact, and well made. I wouldn't use it to photograph most still lifes or products. You can do some architecture with its capabilities, but not that in which the most extreme of image distortion is desired. It is a great camera for shooting people, especially if it has a cammed 240 lens, and it is great for landscapes too.

    You will need some sort of viewfinder to use it hand held, and they prove to be rather expensive, even on the used market. They range from $150 to $350 depending on model and condition (which is why I was so lucky to get one in one of the kits I purchased).

    You also want to see if it has a hand grip or at least a leather strap. Some have neckstrap lugs as well, which is a great help, IMO. (Only one of mine has them.)

    Lens boards are specific to the III (and possibly the II, though I don't have any idea). They will not work on any of the later models (IVs, Vs, etc.).

    As for the specific movements, this is what you get:

    Back tilt, 15 deg. forward or rearward
    Back swing, 15 deg. clockwise or counterclockwise
    Front rise, about 4-5, maybe 6 cm
    Front fall, some, but very little
    Front lateral shift, about 1-1.5 cm either way
    Front swing, 10-15 deg. either way
    Front rearward tilt, 15 deg.
    Dropping bed (versions 4 and 5 only), 15 degrees
    *Dropping bed, front rearward tilt, and front rise can be used together to provide front forward tilt of 15 degrees
    Triple-extendable bellows
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 09-10-2010 at 08:39 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #14
    outwest's Avatar
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    Looks like this is a version 4 which does have the drop bed. Of course, even without the drop bed you could turn the camera on its side and use the swing for tilt.

  5. #15

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    Kim,

    I think that is a good price but 2F brings up a good point about the bellows. When using film, holes in bellows are the enemy and the photos that you posted do not indicate that the bellows are good or bad. Ask the sellor if the bellows are light tight. I have a camera that has bellows over a 110 years old...it is a Studio 10, built like tank and weighs as much, bellows are light tight. Another camera is 105 and shooting film through it is a bit iffy. Most of my work is wetplate so if the bellows are iffy I just drape a cloth over them.

    Anyway read the LF photo front pages, some really good info there for entry into the LF arena. I read it alot before I took the plunge and I thought I knew what i was getting into! :-) Once it is in your hands you will learn ALOT. 4x5 is a great format to learn on. Newer cameras may be lighter but the linhof holds value, built very very well and is an excellent camera.

    have fun!

    Let us know how it fares.

    ./e

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by outwest View Post
    Looks like this is a version 4 which does have the drop bed. Of course, even without the drop bed you could turn the camera on its side and use the swing for tilt.
    Yes. I just saw the photos, and although the notches in the struts for the bed cannot be seen (indicative that the camera has a dropping bed), the lock knobs for the rear movements being on the top peg it as a version four.

    Version five also has the dropping bed, but looks like a Tech. IV, with the angled 3D bed shape that we have come to associate with all Technikas.

    They are heavy cameras, and they do not have a side tripod mount like a Graphic. You can turn the camera on its side to work around its limitations, but it is not the most stable thing in the world to do. Doing so also makes your bubble levels useless, except for the tilt level on the tripod.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 09-10-2010 at 06:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  7. #17
    outwest's Avatar
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    Which brings us back to the fact that the back has more movements than probably 99.9% of photographers would ever need - and that most lenses have an I.C. for!
    (Perhaps I should explain that - using excessive front movements it is easy to outrun the capabilities of coverage of most lenses.)

  8. #18

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    I can't help with the camera, but the tripod that comes with it is a wonderful one. I use one with a Sinar head with my Norma camera and love it. It is light-weight, easy to set up, and VERY stable and solid. It's a bit bulky folded, but if that is not an issue with where I am working I much prefer it to my carbon fiber Gitzo 1325.
    ___________________________________________

    Richard Wasserman

    http://www.richardwasserman.net

  9. #19
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    A stable but light tripod. I have a stable but heavy one and I regret it every time I take a hike with it.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #20
    Kim Catton's Avatar
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    So... I am biding last minute on this... everything is good and the camera should be mine for the price of about 580USD...then...when I am biding a stupid mistake occours - something to do with my address not being the right one (the auction was a national one in a country I have just moved to...my address not changed) and I see the camere go off... I have spent several weeks just waiting for this perfect bargain. I am really frustrated now...if anyone know of a linhof technika for sale.. please let me know.

    dammit...

    Kim

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