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  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Like this?

    Is this what you want? http://www.apug.org/gallery1/files/6...or_posting.jpg

    This scene is at 9mm = 1 foot. It was taken with a Nikon.

    PE

  2. #12
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    Bingo, PE.

    OP, special effects photographers bend over backwards to make miniatures, models, and simulations appear real. I'm not sure what is served by making real scenes appear like toys, models, or cartoons. Has all the stink of a digitally inspired fad. Not trying to be a wet blanket, but that's my take on it.
    Last edited by David William White; 10-11-2010 at 10:27 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Considerably AWOL at the present time...

    Archive/Blog: http://davidwilliamwhite.blogspot.com

  3. #13
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    I am seeing a bit too much of this effect lately, to be honest. I've seen it quite a few times in aerial landscapes, most recently in the Sept. 6 edition of Time magazine (images by Vincent Laforet).

    N.b. you can easily get this effect without tilt/shift lens or view camera. You can simply tilt your enlarger stage (or the photo paper), or you can re-photograph your print or slide and so forth.

    Anyway I will admit indulging in the mini effect a few times. Interesting is that it generated a bit of controversy when a Nat Geo photographer used this effect when revisiting New Orleans in the aftermath of Katrina.

    P.S. some time ago I remember posting some thoughts on how the effect works i.e. why we perceive the scene as miniaturized when there is severely limited DOF. Basically the very quick refocus of our eyes creates the appearance of infinite depth of field for almost all common scenes that we see. This only breaks down at very close focus e.g. when you hold an object at the near-point of your eyes' accommodation. So... we tend to associate shallow DOF with small objects very near the eye.
    Last edited by keithwms; 10-11-2010 at 10:32 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by David William White View Post
    Bingo, PE.

    OP, special effects photographers bend over backwards to make miniatures, models, and simulations appear real. I'm not sure what is served by making real scenes appear like toys, models, or cartoons. Has all the stink of a digitally inspired fad. Not trying to be a wet blanket, but that's my take on it.
    I think more than anything, it`s just something fun to mess around with.

  5. #15
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    Treymac, yes, it's basically that simple. If you have access to one of the aforementioned lenses/cameras then you could easily experiment with the effect, granted you have to have the right vantage point as was mentioned.

    It's becoming overused, but it's a very powerful phenomenon. It has nothing to do with digital intrinsically, except that a lot of people can do it now with software alone.. big whoop.

    It's definitely neat. That much I'll say

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Treymac, yes, it's basically that simple. If you have access to one of the aforementioned lenses/cameras then you could easily experiment with the effect, granted you have to have the right vantage point as was mentioned.

    It's becoming overused, but it's a very powerful phenomenon. It has nothing to do with digital intrinsically, except that a lot of people can do it now with software alone.. big whoop.

    It's definitely neat. That much I'll say
    I`m definitely going to be going out to try it, I actually have a perfect spot - there`s a mountain that I can drive up with a lot of houses on it. Although I`ll be doing it in B&W, which sounds interesting because I`ve only ever seen it done in colour. And ya, I`ve seen tutorials on how to do it digitally, but doing it that just seems pointless. Doing it at the enlarger also sounds kind of interesting.

  7. #17
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    Yeah, black and white might be cool. I've never seen it either, come to think of it.

    The enlarger idea is interesting... one time I was projecting slides and I had this shot from the top of a press booth looking down onto a football field, when I projected it at an angle onto the wall the effect was striking.

    Be sure to post the results!
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  8. #18

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    The first examples page has a big header on it, saying "Tilt-shift photography".
    Which, of course, provided a clue that is hard to miss.


    However, some of the examples shown are not that easy to produce without doing what one caption reads: "fake tilt shift effect".

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    The first examples page has a big header on it, saying "Tilt-shift photography".
    Which, of course, provided a clue that is hard to miss.


    However, some of the examples shown are not that easy to produce without doing what one caption reads: "fake tilt shift effect".
    Question, tilting is rotating the front lens plate, but what is shifting?

    [edit: never mind, I just did quite a bit of reading on large format and it makes a lot more sense now]
    Last edited by Treymac; 10-12-2010 at 02:28 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20
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    Well, my photos were models setup to look "real" and taken with a Nikon using a commercial "pinhole" adapter. I used one flash and a fill light (flash) slaved to it. Both flashes were mounted on the ceiling by clamps. There were to tilts or swings used, as the Nikon does not do them easily.

    The RZ67 has a nice tilt/swing adapter and lens. Most 4x5 cameras have that and add shift as well.

    Shifting is lateral movement of the back of the camera in the case of my 4x5s.

    PE

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