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  1. #1

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    How to get the miniature effect?

    Hey guys. I've been looking to try to take a photo with the miniature effect. But I'm having some trouble finding out how exactly to do it. Youtube doesn't have any videos on it either. So how it the effect achieved? Something to do with tilt and shift, although I'm not 100% sure what those things are exactly. Is it difficult to do?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    No not hard.

    Need to get a POV that looks down into the scene, like you might look at a model railroad.

    Use tilt to reduce DOF and isolate a subject.

    Play until it looks right and shoot.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #3
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    I like to see an example.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    I like to see an example.
    http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2008...t-photography/

    (Probably not film at all, some more manipulation in post-exposure than true tilt-shift. Maybe some actual miniatures, too.)

  5. #5

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    From the examples, it seems like you want narrow depth of field at relatively low magnifications. Since depth of field depends on magnification, this is impossible to achieve without re-orienting the plane of focus. You can do this in the camera using movements, or in the enlarger, if you have one with a tilting lens stage.

    I have never heard this called "the miniature effect," but I guess it can make things seem small by combining the low magnification of the subjects with the smearing out of detail, making it seem less realistic.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  6. #6
    Tom Nutter's Avatar
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    Claudio Edinger has been doing something like this in his recent work:

    http://www.claudioedinger.com/

  7. #7
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Nutter View Post
    Claudio Edinger has been doing something like this in his recent work:

    http://www.claudioedinger.com/
    Cool link.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #8
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    You tilt the lens which shifts the plane of focus. Your plane of focus is like a wall projecting out from the lens.. if you want to imagine it that way. By tilting this plane at an angle, you intersect your subject at a weird angle, or in other words, you tilt this "wall" so that it hits the scene off kilter.

    Not my best description, but that's how I see it.

    View cameras make this easy, as do MF cameras like the Rollei SL66. 35mm cameras also have T/S or PC (tilt/shift, perspective control respectively) lenses. Such as...

    http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...kkor/index.htm
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/find/new...onTS-E17mm.jsp

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    You tilt the lens which shifts the plane of focus. Your plane of focus is like a wall projecting out from the lens.. if you want to imagine it that way. By tilting this plane at an angle, you intersect your subject at a weird angle, or in other words, you tilt this "wall" so that it hits the scene off kilter.

    Not my best description, but that's how I see it.

    View cameras make this easy, as do MF cameras like the Rollei SL66. 35mm cameras also have T/S or PC (tilt/shift, perspective control respectively) lenses. Such as...

    http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...kkor/index.htm
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/find/new...onTS-E17mm.jsp
    Ok, so you just focus it like normal shot, then tilt the front lens plate either left, right, up, or down, wherever you want the focus to be?

    Thanks.

  10. #10
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    You need the vantage point. May or may not be easy.



    Point the camera down, but use front tilt back. This will put only a central band in focus on the ground. It\'s exactly the opposite tilt you would use to get the whole scene in focus.





    It\'s a technique begging for a Crown Graphic.
    Last edited by michaelbsc; 10-11-2010 at 11:00 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

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