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  1. #1
    Rob Skeoch's Avatar
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    If you're shooting 4x10 please chirp in

    I'm in the market for a new camera. Right now I have an 8x10 but am getting a new one. I'm considering getting an 4x10 instead of an 8x10.

    If you shoot with a 4x10 please chirp in.

    Are you glad you bought it, instead of 8x10?

    Issues finding film?

    Which lens do you use the most?

    Overall are you glad you did it?

    -Rob
    Rob Skeoch
    This is my blog http://thepicturedesk.blogspot.com/
    This my website for photo supplies...
    www.bigcameraworkshops.com
    This is my website for Rangfinder gear
    www.rangefinderstore.com

  2. #2

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    It's a little soon for me to answer all your questions as I am in the process of building a 4x10 camera. I started with an older 4x5 Arca Swiss and bought a Shen Hao 4x10 reducing back for their 8x10 cameras. I cut the back down and am making a frame for it and the new bellows which I will order from Custom Bellows. I have an older 180mm Fuji lens that will cover nicely and a 10" Commercial Ektar. If I find that I need something wider I'll use my 110mm Super Symmar XL. I hope to have the camera completed within a month as I have a project in mind that I will be using it for. I purchased a Fotoman film slitter to cut down 8x10 film. It works really well and even notches the film so you can tell the emulsion side in the dark. A small rotary paper trimmer would also work well I'm sure. I hope to use C41 color film and Phoenix Labs here in Chicago said they'd be happy to try processing it–they're pretty confident they can do it even though it will be a first for them.

    If I had an 8x10 I would seriously consider a reducing back for it rather than a dedicated 4x10 camera which seems a bit specialized to me as an only camera. You could easily do verticals too. I primarily shoot 4x5.

    I hope this helps!
    ___________________________________________

    Richard Wasserman

    http://www.richardwasserman.net

  3. #3
    BradS's Avatar
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    (....marginally related....)
    I had a widelux (a 35mm swing lens panoramic camera). The prints from those negatives were 4x10....which I find to be unsatisfying small for most subjects. I can't laying out for a 4x10 camera and holders and then putting up with the hassle of cutting film for that size print. It would be fun to fool around with once in a while, but, I think a carefully trimmed darkslide would do the job at much less hassle and cost.

  4. #4
    David William White's Avatar
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    kind of interested myself...rob, what's your latest intel on the shenhao's?
    Considerably AWOL at the present time...

    Archive/Blog: http://davidwilliamwhite.blogspot.com

  5. #5
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    I have 4x10 and 8x10 among others. I built the 4x10. It is very handy for me when it is too much of a hike to take the 7x17. I also have a 6x17 cm Fuji. Each camera has its own purpose and It would be difficult to give up any of them.
    A cut down 8x10 dark slide does work well, but you still have to carry the extra weight.
    At my age of 81, I carry as little as possible for as short a distance as possible.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  6. #6
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I shoot a dedicated 5x12 (Canham, so it actually is also a 5x7 with the appropriate hardware swap). I just order my film during the annual Ilford ULF run. I don't shoot so much with it that I ever run out, because panoramics are definitely a specialty thing. If a lens covers 8x10, it covers 5x12, so there's no issue with lenses. In deciding to get the 5x12 as opposed to trying to shoot 4x10 some way, I found that the 4x10 print just felt too small. The 5x12 isn't that much bigger, but it sure feels different. The downside is trying to find holders (which isn't that much different for 4x10 if you want dedicated holders instead of doing the cut darkslide on an 8x10). They're rare and expensive.

  7. #7
    Rob Skeoch's Avatar
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    The plan would be to get the ShenHao 4x10 and three holders. I plan to print them with my 8x10 enlarger.

    I still have film from the large format special run since I'm the retail seller in Canada.
    Rob Skeoch
    This is my blog http://thepicturedesk.blogspot.com/
    This my website for photo supplies...
    www.bigcameraworkshops.com
    This is my website for Rangfinder gear
    www.rangefinderstore.com

  8. #8
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    ...I think a carefully trimmed darkslide would do the job at much less hassle and cost.
    That is what I do -- two camera formats for the cost and weight of a half-darkslide!

    The hassle with it is, 1) Remembering that extra step in the process (removing the full darkslide and putting in the modified one -- and reversing that after the exposure) and 2) Keeping track of which half got exposed, etc! I still mess up occasionally.

    But a dedicated 4x10 could really cut down the space and weight -- close to a 5x7 -- for some serious hiking, yet still get that 10" long neg!

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  9. #9

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    I use a 5x7 Canham and a 4x10 Canham back. Takes very little time to switch formats in the field - the 4x10 back adds to the size of the equipment bag I carry, but it is smaller than an additional camera. For film I use the 4x10 from Ilford's special order, and I cut down 8x10. There are a number of posts around on the use of cut 8x10 dark slides vs a 4x10 camera - when I made my decision, I opted for the simpler working solution of a 4x10 camera with the downside of its added cost. Holders can be bought new from Canham.

  10. #10
    8x20_Pano_Shooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Skeoch View Post
    I'm in the market for a new camera. Right now I have an 8x10 but am getting a new one. I'm considering getting an 4x10 instead of an 8x10.

    If you shoot with a 4x10 please chirp in.

    Are you glad you bought it, instead of 8x10?

    Issues finding film?

    Which lens do you use the most?

    Overall are you glad you did it?

    -Rob
    Rob,
    Let me be the first to welcome you to the pano world. I use to shoot 8x10. But now I am exclusively 4x10 and 8x20. I prefer the pano format. I use Ilford HP5+ and order a year's supply at a time. If needed, 8x10 film is cut and I have a Kalt slide notcher which I use to mark the unnotched piece of film. Depending upon how far I have to go to get the shot determines the camera for me. I can carry the 8x20 complete, ready to shoot with two film holders only about 75 yards from the vehicle. Past that, I get the backpack out. I have two 4x10 cameras. . .one horizontal (4x10 Canham) and one vertical. My husband built the vertical camera for me. http://www.jbhphoto.com/vcam/vcams.htm It is a different mindset shooting this format. I carry a Zone VI viewing filter that is modified specifically for 4x10. Each 4x10 has its own backpack and set of lenses. I'll provide you with a summary of what I use. Schneider 120mm Super Angulon, 6 1/2" WA Dagor, 210 Apo Symmar, 240 G Claron, 16 1/2" Artar, 19" Artar, 305 G Claron and a 24" Artar. Some of these lenses may not work on the camera that you choose due to the amount of bellows draw. I have a lot of duplicate length lenses, but again, that's because I have two complete backpack systems. For me, there's not really a lens that is used the most. I shoot in all types of locations and that's what determine the lens. I crop on the ground glass, not in the darkroom.

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