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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    As John says it's the design of the back and holders that's critical not whether they hold film or glass plates. Some older wooden plate holders set the plate or film far more deeply inside the holder than others, I'm thinking particularly of the very much thinner German and British 9x12cm & quarter plate holders.

    Ideally if modern holders fit you should measure the register and shim the ground glass, if it used older wooden holders the register need moving back a little.

    Ian

  2. #12
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by borek View Post
    Hi Mark,I have same problem.I have not back side Pony Premo-1908 year,where I find it?I repair this camera,now it nice but no back side.
    Here is my e-mail borek_t@hotmail.com Thanks borek
    Hi Borek,

    I don't know where to get the parts.

    I was poking around on Ebay looking for whole cameras, check there.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #13
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the info, helps a bunch!
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #14

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    I have read somewhere that if you put a piece of cardboard behind the film in a plate holder, it will bring the film into the correct register. IIRC, you dont want a tight piece of cardboard, thickness wise. Just thick enough to register the film correctly.

  5. #15
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by premo View Post
    I have read somewhere that if you put a piece of cardboard behind the film in a plate holder, it will bring the film into the correct register. IIRC, you dont want a tight piece of cardboard, thickness wise. Just thick enough to register the film correctly.
    One problem is that the film size isn't the same as the plate size, it's smaller. This is because intially plate holders were fitted with metal adaptors so film needed to be narrower and shorter to allow for the metal thickness etc.

    So where a piece of card is used people often use a dab of honey or similar to keep the film in place, otherwise it can fall out

    Ian

  6. #16
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    Perhaps I'm misunderstanding the original question, but it seemed to be about the holder fitting the camera, not about film/plate thickness. If I'm right, I have a little something to add: The really early Rochester Camera Manufacturing Co. cameras used odd sizes (by today's standard) for their film holders. They are longer and wider. During one of the many reorganizations of the company, they standardized on what we have come to expect from Fidelity, Graflex, etc. holders. Google "Rochester camera companies" for details on the company's many reincarnations.

    When they went with what we now consider standard, they added the ridge that locks the holder in place on the camera back - previous versions are completely flat, and the camera back has no corresponding groove into which the ridge would fit. At least, this is my experience. If your camera back has a groove just inside the end where the holder would be placed, it most likely takes "modern" holders. If not, be on the lookout for Rochester plate holders and add film sheaths. As has been said by previous posters, the film plane placement makes little practical difference on a camera that is likely to have many other minor aberrations and a 100 year old lens. Mine works just fine.

    Of course trying one out makes the most sense. If it seems to fit, shoot some film. That will tell you very quickly.

  7. #17
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteymorange View Post
    Perhaps I'm misunderstanding the original question, but it seemed to be about the holder fitting the camera, not about film/plate thickness. If I'm right, I have a little something to add: The really early Rochester Camera Manufacturing Co. cameras used odd sizes (by today's standard) for their film holders. They are longer and wider. During one of the many reorganizations of the company, they standardized on what we have come to expect from Fidelity, Graflex, etc. holders. Google "Rochester camera companies" for details on the company's many reincarnations.

    When they went with what we now consider standard, they added the ridge that locks the holder in place on the camera back - previous versions are completely flat, and the camera back has no corresponding groove into which the ridge would fit. At least, this is my experience. If your camera back has a groove just inside the end where the holder would be placed, it most likely takes "modern" holders. If not, be on the lookout for Rochester plate holders and add film sheaths. As has been said by previous posters, the film plane placement makes little practical difference on a camera that is likely to have many other minor aberrations and a 100 year old lens. Mine works just fine.

    Of course trying one out makes the most sense. If it seems to fit, shoot some film. That will tell you very quickly.
    You have discerned well, thanks.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #18

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    Yes, before the modern standards, film holders were a mixed lot of sizes depending on manufacturer. I have Eastman whole-plate film holders from the 1920s that appear to have had the ridge sanded flat to work with my 1895 Rochester Optical Company camera. The camera must originally have been a plate camera. There is a little brass springy-thingy that would click into place on the end of the original plate holders to hold them in place while pulling the dark slide. To have worked properly, the plate holders would have been a little bit shorter than the Eastmans. I've been lucky so far having purchased old cameras and usable holders.

    Peter Gomena

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