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  1. #11
    Laurent's Avatar
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    Looks like a good kit. The 65mm would be better on a recessed board, but even on a flat one it should allow you to focus at infinity (at least a Grandagon I tried on my Tachihara allowed me to do so).

    The Tachihara is a very nice camera.
    Laurent

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  2. #12

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    the lenses alone are worth almost $1K ...
    looks like a worthwhile investment,
    that you could easily sell if you decide
    you don't like the 5x4 experience.
    i think jerevan is right about the 65mm lens
    maybe it was for the roll film back .. but
    i have also heard like laurent says
    a 65mm angulon might
    just barely cover a 5x4 sheet


    john

  3. #13

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    A guy offered me a similar Deardorff kit for $2500. This a good deal. I would get it I if was you
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

    Canon A-1, Canon AE-1, Canon Canonet GIII 17, Argus 21, Rolleicord Va, Mamiya RB67, Voigtländer Bessa

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  4. #14

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    jnanian, that was my read on the value as well, thanks for the confirmation (pending condition, etc of course)

    Honestly, I'll need to sell off a few of the lenses to cover this if I go for it. I'd love to keep the Fujinon and Nikkor but as the highest price items, but one or both will have to go. I can always pick them up down the road if that is where my shooting takes me. I'm less excited about the Schneider - particularly if it doesn't cover 4x5. I'm not sure about it yet.

    If I did sell off all three lenses, that would still leave me with the Tachihara, Rodenstock 150mm, holders, the 120/220 back and a bunch of accessories for an outlay closer to $300. I can't complain about that.
    Last edited by Brian Legge; 11-27-2010 at 11:44 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15
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    Good Deal

    Its sounds like a great deal. I'd check the market on the lenses as you could have them up for sale for quite some time before they sell. Keep the the 150 and 240 they will be of the most use starting out and 95% of the rest of the time. I have a linhof TechIII I shelled out $500 bucks for some years ago and have never been sorry.
    No escaping it!
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    to take this path

  6. #16
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    4 lenses and a camera for $1000 is a good deal as long as the lenses are in working order (shutters aren't all gummed up).

    You'll also want some film & supplies that probably aren't free. If you do darkroom now, you might have half this stuff.
    $75 1 box of film (tmy2 is my choice)
    $? 1 changing tent if you don't have a darkroom or temporary darkroom
    $0 some anti static bags for storing/transporting the loaded film holders (probably free from computer repair places or IT departments)
    $90 system for developing the film (combiplan tank, or mod photographic reel and used 3-roll sized paterson tank)
    $50 chemicals
    $30 quality stainless thermometer
    $25 negative pages for storing processed film
    $10 measuring container, funnel, etc..

    Then you'll have some potentially nice negatives which you can scan ($400ish and up for an epson v700 or better) or get the stuff for printing it. Used 4x5 enlargers will cost you more to transport than their purchase price; keep an eye on your local craigslist or ebay sorted by distance. If you buy one online at Ebay or here or something, figure $150 shipping if the seller is willing to prepare it for shipping and put it on a pallet.

  7. #17
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    Yeah, the 65 might cover if you shoot head-on, with no rise/fall and stopping down a bit beyond f22 (f32 or f45). What's confusing me a bit is the f:9 part. Let's see what it really says on the lens when you have had a look at the kit.
    Last edited by Jerevan; 11-27-2010 at 02:24 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  8. #18
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    I shot 4x5 for several years, then stopped when I bought a Nikon D80 then D300. I pulled it out a few months ago and was blown away by how much more detail I get from 4x5 than I do Nikon DSLR. One thing I'll bring up is that to be really happy, you need a scanner. I just bought a used Epson V700 for $290 from eBay. I'm buying the wet mount holders from BetterScanning.com in a week or two. I'm using the stock Epson holders until then. Doing your own scanning is the way to go, I think. If you photo in a studio it won't matter so much what camera you get. If you photo outdoors much, a field camera is the thing to get. I'm once again shooting 4x5, so far only b&w.


    Kent in SD

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Two23 View Post
    I shot 4x5 for several years, then stopped when I bought a Nikon D80 then D300. I pulled it out a few months ago and was blown away by how much more detail I get from 4x5 than I do Nikon DSLR. One thing I'll bring up is that to be really happy, you need a scanner. I just bought a used Epson V700 for $290 from eBay. I'm buying the wet mount holders from BetterScanning.com in a week or two. I'm using the stock Epson holders until then. Doing your own scanning is the way to go, I think. If you photo in a studio it won't matter so much what camera you get. If you photo outdoors much, a field camera is the thing to get. I'm once again shooting 4x5, so far only b&w.

    Kent in SD
    I am still blown away by how much more detail I get from 35mm film than from a digital camera. Anything above 35mm, digital does not even begin to approach. I guess I must be really easy to please!
    2F/2F

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  10. #20

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    Thanks again all -

    I'm primarily an outdoor, wander-about photographer. I've dabbled in studio work but I don't think its my thing. That was what lead me to a field camera; the more portable something is, the more likely I am to use it. Once I get comfortable with it, I expect this will also become a reason to do a little more traveling with my wife.

    I develop 35mm and 120 at home using a dark bag and daylight tank. I haven't decided on tray vs tank yet for 4x5. I was already planning to set up a darkroom in the garage though with a 4x5 enlarger. This will just accelerate that plan. I'll probably shoot roll film at first while I continue getting that set up. Once I do, I plan to shoot primarily 4x5 sheet and leave the MF to the MF cameras.

    At that point, my goal would be to make prints for 4x5 shots (probably a mix of contact prints and 8x10s at first). To get work online, I'm going to try to stick with scanning prints. I scan negatives right now in absence of a darkroom but I have a 8800f. I'm going to try to keep 4x5 more analog at least for a while.

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