Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,212   Posts: 1,532,081   Online: 1240
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,156
    While one cannot argue at all with your premise about the fact that every part of one's gear should be funtioning properly,there seems to be a sense that one cannot always be completely certain about the holders, the slides, the seal in the light trap, etc. Indeed, on occasion human error might result in a less than perfect light tight seal when the holders are inserted. It is interesting to note that amongst the skilled and well known photographers who have responded there are different ways of proceeding.

  2. #12
    stevebrot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Vancouver USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    113
    My camera has no light leaks, but I often leave the cloth draped when shooting in full sunlight. I have noticed that at least one of my film holders leaks a little when the darkslide is removed.


    Steve

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by Mahler_one View Post
    Yes Peter...exactly the spread of opinions that my friend and I have discussed with each other! Obviously there simply is no, "right or wrong".
    One thing I've found with photography, especially with the intricacies of the view camera, developing sheet film, and processing is that theres almost never a right or wrong answer for anything. Everyone has their own way of going about things that works for them.

    I'd say for the darkcloth question, do whatever you're more comfortable with. If it would make your more comfortable and suit your OCD or paranoia (don't mean this as an insult, I'd imagine a lot of us here, myself included, are OCD/paranoid to some extent), then do it.

    Personally, I don't. I find it gets in the way of puling the dark slide and acts as a perfect sail for wind to grab. I'd say as a default, take it off, but if you start to see unexplained light leaks on your film then (a) check your equipment and/or (b) leave the dark cloth on.

    I suppose a good way to test this would be to sacrifice a sheet of film, load it into the camera and pull the dark slide. Either leave it in direct sunlight for ten minutes or so, or spend some time passing a powerful flashlight around every crevasse of the camera and film holder. Develop the film to see if theres anything other than a blank negative.
    ~ Michelle

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,314
    My whole plate camera was made in 1895 and has its original bellows, which I double-coated with paint-on plastic sealer when I first bought it. Pinholes everywhere. My 5x7 was made about 1906. Its bellows are nearly as good as when they were made, and the entire camera is in amazingly good condition.

    Using either of these old beasts is like taking a Model T Ford out for a spin on the weekend. You're never quite sure when something will loosen up, fall off, split, crack, or leak. It's part of the charm of using an antique. (Film is ruined occasionally, but that's life.) It's kind of like owning a wooden boat. Yes, these are problems. I deal with them in the field and I fix them when I'm home. Wrapping my dark cloth around either camera is just a little bit of insurance.

    I would approach the whole situation differently if I was a working professional, trust me.

    Peter Gomena

  5. #15
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,167
    I don't use a dark cloth with 4x5, I use a fold-out hood. My friend uses a 90degree finder (again without a dark cloth). Fog is a combination of light and time, so I move quickly in bright light and I shade the slot with the darkslide if the sun would shine on it. I keep the film holders in a dark bag.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,644
    I'm in the paranoid camp. Question I'd pose is how easy is it to repeat the image if later find an issue with the negative? Cameras and film holders will have possibly imperceptible wear on areas most used - the film holder/camera back interface. Everything from light trapping material to wood/metal back would need vigilant maintenance; but most of us don't have assistants to hand us an inspected camera/holder. How many spend the time to inspect bellows, holders etc. before an outing? A darkcloth draped over the back seems a reasonable insurance against light-leaks. In higher winds I usually hold onto the cloth to keep it from flapping, and wait for a lull.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  7. #17
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Virginia, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,891
    Images
    241
    I'm camped out in paranoia with doughowk. I have only been shooting large format for a little over a year, and noticed that some of my negatives exposed in direct sunlight were light struck. I also noted that different holders would be implicated in the problem, other times not. I surmised that direct sunlight might be getting in through the dark slide slot, and so began keeping the dark cloth in place to shade the holder during exposure, and even trying to shade the holder as much as possible when moving the holder from the bag to the camera.

    I have since suspected that not completely inserting the holder into the camera was a more likely culprit, but by now I have developed the habit of keeping the dark cloth in place during exposure. And for me at least, habits are very important to making successful large format exposures.

    I should also mention that I have never gotten along well with a traditional dark cloth, instead using a black XXL T-shirt. The neck stretches perfectly over the back of my Tech III and stays in place until I pull it off. It is easy to slip the holder into the camera with the T-shirt in place and drape it over the back during exposure. It is dark enough to let me see the ground glass well, but lighter to carry, less weighty on my head and shoulders, and cooler to use in hot weather. The fact that it is lighter and lets air circulate through seems to make it less likely to cause wind-induced camera shake.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,156
    Sounds like a reasonable approach Doug.

    Dan...what a great suggestion. I think I will start to look for one of those large black tees!

  9. #19
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Stratford-upon-Avon, England
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,413
    I find a darkcloth to act like a huge sail, which can cause the my whole LF kit inc tripod to topple to the ground in only a moderate wind

    Therefore I am in the definately "Take it off" camp

    I will also use the darkcloth was a wind break if required

    Martin

  10. #20
    Maris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Noosa, Queensland, Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    723
    I'll use the dark cloth if the sun is shining directly into the dark slide slot from the side. If the sun is shining from the top I try to put the camera back on upside down so the dark slide slot is facing the ground when the slide is out. The only time I've had a camera blow over was a classic "dark cloth equals sail" incident. You need to be several paces away in order to provoke this.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin