Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,707   Posts: 1,548,542   Online: 935
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22
  1. #11
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ye Olde England
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,478
    Images
    23
    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    The MPP is in my son's bedroom and he's asleep so I'll check the model tomorrow. I gave it a clean and strip down a few months ago and all appeared to be in order.
    There are a few of us that use the MPP cameras lurking here (myself included). Mine is an ex-mil S92 with an international back from a Series VI/VII and stripped of the range finder. One day I'm going to butcher the casing and try to reduce the weight further...

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    easter NY, 2 miles so. of Canadian border
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    97
    The only pan sheet film I've ever used was agfa apx 100. I had been developing ortho (and still do) in 1-50 Rodinal for about 12 min @ 65 degrees. Anyway, I pre-rinse in water for a couple of minutes to cool the film from room temperature, then slip it into 6 oz. of developer mix ( 5X7 tray) one or two at a time. Next into an 8X10 tray for 2 min rinse then into the hypo, and then 6 changes of water in the fourth tray, 5 minutes each, then dry. If you use Ilford Ortho, you can develope under a red safelight, which will be a little easier.

  3. #13
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    Great thread. And great answer, John
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  4. #14
    erikg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    pawtucket rhode island usa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,409
    My process is pretty much like John's but there are a couple of things I would offer. When you transfer the film to the water tray, keep one hand dry, maybe it seems obvious, but I had a heck of a time with film sticking together until I figured that out. When shuffling a stack I turn the first sheet into the developer around so the code notch is at the opposite end from all of the other sheets, that way I can keep track of the order without having to count the whole time, something I always mess up.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Seattle
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,212
    Images
    47
    I recommend an 8x10 tray, flat bottom, no dimples or grooves. ( no edge groove either, think gold toner cost later) You want the film to be able glide a little. It's all too easy to get too much edge development from wave kickback in a 5x7 tray. Being able to experience a differing wave pattern leads to, not necessarily better negs, but less of a chance of getting bit by Murphy's law on the great one.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    46
    I agree with vet173, use the tray with flat bottom. I dev 8X10 on Paterson tray, it has under dev mark on the dimples area. Try to avoid my mistake.

  7. #17
    mjs
    mjs is offline

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Elkhart, Indiana (USA)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,106
    Images
    2
    You asked about scratches: I develop up to a dozen 4x5 negatives at a time in 8x10 trays; I found that having the film emulsion side down is one important factor to avoid scratching, and having sufficient fluid volume is also important. For me, a quart of solution (32 US oz., or just about 1 liter,) in an 8x10 tray is about the minimum volume of solution to avoid scratching. With straight D76, this volume will process 16 4x5 negatives, so I normally process film 8 sheets at a time, if I have more than a dozen sheets.

    Remember that there's no need to hurry frantically when shuffling through the negatives: find a pace which allows you to be careful and set the negative you've removed from the bottom of the stack onto the top flat, without digging a corner into the negative below. You might want to process the first half dozen or dozen negatives one at a time, just so you get the times and agitation down and have some practice, then gradually build up the number of negatives you process at a time until you find what's comfortable for you. This will also provide you with some error-free negatives, so you know that you can do it!

    Good luck!

    Mike
    Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming– “Wow! What a Ride!”

    — Hunter S. Thompson

  8. #18
    Toffle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Point Pelee, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,796
    Images
    122
    I'd like to throw another variable into the mix here...

    I don't generally pre-soak my film, but I wonder to what extent it helps in the tray developing process. The reason I mention it is I generally slide the whole sheet into the developer in one smooth motion, but the other night, I must have left a sheet of 8x10 lying on top of the liquid for all of two or three seconds while I placed the empty holder on a table. As far as I can tell, I did everything else in my process exactly by the book, (certainly exactly the same as the other negatives I processed that night) but this one negative has definite dark lines where the developer first contacted the sheet. This, despite the fact that my overall developing time was 20 min. It appears that the interstice between developer and air for those three seconds was enough to create a zone of hyper-active development that resulted in the lines on my negatives.

    I wonder if pre-soaking my negatives would be of any help in avoiding this problem in the future. If nothing else, I guess it would give me time to put down my film holders before immersing the film in the processing bath.

    Opinions? Have I just learned something that you have all known all along and I was just too dense to pick up on it?

    Cheers,
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

    Ansel Adams had the Zone System... I'm working on the points system. First I points it here, and then I points it there...

    http://tom-overton-images.weebly.com


  9. #19
    erikg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    pawtucket rhode island usa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,409
    Quote Originally Posted by Toffle View Post
    I'd like to throw another variable into the mix here...

    I don't generally pre-soak my film, but I wonder to what extent it helps in the tray developing process. The reason I mention it is I generally slide the whole sheet into the developer in one smooth motion, but the other night, I must have left a sheet of 8x10 lying on top of the liquid for all of two or three seconds while I placed the empty holder on a table. As far as I can tell, I did everything else in my process exactly by the book, (certainly exactly the same as the other negatives I processed that night) but this one negative has definite dark lines where the developer first contacted the sheet. This, despite the fact that my overall developing time was 20 min. It appears that the interstice between developer and air for those three seconds was enough to create a zone of hyper-active development that resulted in the lines on my negatives.

    I wonder if pre-soaking my negatives would be of any help in avoiding this problem in the future. If nothing else, I guess it would give me time to put down my film holders before immersing the film in the processing bath.

    Opinions? Have I just learned something that you have all known all along and I was just too dense to pick up on it?

    Cheers,
    I think you've got it, the presoak would certainly take care of that problem. I don't presoak roll films any more, but I always do it with sheet film in trays for precisely this reason. You then can work at a more methodical pace. As for sheet film holders, I usually unload my film into a box prior to developing, separating them into various groups for development variations or just for safety sake, not putting all the eggs in one tray... I often am wanting the holders for use between developing sessions as well.

  10. #20
    Toffle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Point Pelee, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,796
    Images
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by erikg View Post
    I think you've got it, the presoak would certainly take care of that problem. I don't presoak roll films any more, but I always do it with sheet film in trays for precisely this reason. You then can work at a more methodical pace. As for sheet film holders, I usually unload my film into a box prior to developing, separating them into various groups for development variations or just for safety sake, not putting all the eggs in one tray... I often am wanting the holders for use between developing sessions as well.
    Thanks, Erik. I suspected that was the problem. I seem to recall a debate some time ago as to whether pre-soaking helped or impaired the flow of developer on the emulsion, but I'm going to give it a shot.

    Cheers,
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

    Ansel Adams had the Zone System... I'm working on the points system. First I points it here, and then I points it there...

    http://tom-overton-images.weebly.com


Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin