Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,960   Posts: 1,523,085   Online: 979
      
Page 2 of 13 FirstFirst 1234567812 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 125
  1. #11
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by stradibarrius View Post
    is LF a lot more difficult than shooting MF? As much as I love photography I don't like or care for the extreme details like formulas and ratios.
    Don't sweat the formulas; we don't photograph formulas.

    Just try LF and see if the simplicity of the gear appeals. That's definitely LF's main attraction to me: simplicity. Less gear and gizmos... just you, your film, some bellows and a lens. Photography in its purest form; you add the complexity, not the gear. Limited and limitless at the same time.

    If you decide, in the future, to use the analytical approach to optimize this or that technical element in your images, then fine. But you certainly don't have to do that. Remember, Weston developed a deep intuition based on ~zero analytical training, and he used some of the simplest gear possible. Adams was far more analytical, but did he install BTZS formulas on his iphone?
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  2. #12
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    I don't know if it will help, but I have a dumbed down LF video in the APUG video archives. It's the B&J video. Might make it look simpler than you're thinking it is.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  3. #13
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    Oh, and so does Jason Brunner.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    139
    I started shooting film 18 months ago on a kodak 8x10 view, but switched to a 4x5 because film was cheaper and easier to get. I've got a Mamiya TLR, and Holga (so I can be trendy), a DSLR, a couple of digital point and shoots (all that for only 18 months of GAS) The 8x10 is by far the simplest - to - use camera I have. 4x5 is a very close second, but has front swings where the 8x10 doesn't, so it's got one more knob.

    There's no white balance, center weighted or evalauteive metering, wandering autofocus, batteries, power button, blah blah blah , blah blah. Hell, with film, the exposure doesn't even matter that much, so I don't even use a meter - sunny 16, shady 8 rule for me - If i'm a stop or two one way or the other Tri-X doesn't seem to care that much, so I don't worry - I spend more time looking at the scene and trying to visualize what i want on the film - which was the whole point to begin with.

    The only caveat is that if the subject is moving quickly, in low light, and all you want is a record of events, not a "wall hanger", there may be a more "useful" system. Holgas with big effing flashes have their place.

  5. #15
    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Saint Paul, MN
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,895
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    Oh, and so does Jason Brunner.
    Jason Brunner is simpler than we think he is?

  6. #16
    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Saint Paul, MN
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,895
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by totalamateur View Post
    There's no white balance, center weighted or evalauteive metering, wandering autofocus, batteries, power button, blah blah blah , blah blah. Hell, with film, the exposure doesn't even matter that much, so I don't even use a meter - sunny 16, shady 8 rule for me - If i'm a stop or two one way or the other Tri-X doesn't seem to care that much, so I don't worry - I spend more time looking at the scene and trying to visualize what i want on the film - which was the whole point to begin with.
    This is all a really good point. While trying to make things simple, modern technology can create complexity beyond what we are really capable of dealing with.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    303
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    Oh, and so does Jason Brunner.
    Yeah, except now whenever I start to consider bellows factor I get this craving for bacon which can be quite distracting when out in the field...

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    369
    This is a great post. Thanks for putting this up. You've inspired me to do some LF.

    Quote Originally Posted by totalamateur View Post
    I started shooting film 18 months ago on a kodak 8x10 view, but switched to a 4x5 because film was cheaper and easier to get. I've got a Mamiya TLR, and Holga (so I can be trendy), a DSLR, a couple of digital point and shoots (all that for only 18 months of GAS) The 8x10 is by far the simplest - to - use camera I have. 4x5 is a very close second, but has front swings where the 8x10 doesn't, so it's got one more knob.

    There's no white balance, center weighted or evalauteive metering, wandering autofocus, batteries, power button, blah blah blah , blah blah. Hell, with film, the exposure doesn't even matter that much, so I don't even use a meter - sunny 16, shady 8 rule for me - If i'm a stop or two one way or the other Tri-X doesn't seem to care that much, so I don't worry - I spend more time looking at the scene and trying to visualize what i want on the film - which was the whole point to begin with.

    The only caveat is that if the subject is moving quickly, in low light, and all you want is a record of events, not a "wall hanger", there may be a more "useful" system. Holgas with big effing flashes have their place.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    303
    Images
    1
    Oh, that's right there was a point to this thread originally too, wasn't there...

    Not more complicated at all. Borrow a camera if you can and have a go, otherwise just jump in and do it. When I first started in LF I didn't worry too fuch about the finer details (including bellows factor) and if you're shooting landscapes or other things which tend to be focussed at infinity it doesn't come in to play anyway...

    Movements can be learnt later too, and it sounds like you'd be best served just spending some quality time under a dark cloth and playing with tilt and swing until you get an intuitive understanding of how they work.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    305
    Try it... But to warn you... Once you look in the front of a multicoated plasmat lens, you be mesmorized into buying more... Such pretty glass... My prrr... My prrr... MY PRECIOUS!!!

Page 2 of 13 FirstFirst 1234567812 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin