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  1. #1

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    First 4x5 shots...

    Total and complete failure lol.

    My wife loaded, took them and developed them in a photo class (going for her BFA). I only told her how every thing works.
    So we'll start off with error #1 - loaded the film emulsion side in . The day she was going to load it, we tried to remember how it went, but couldn't. A couple days later, I finally remembered that we loaded backwards...
    Problem #1 - our dark cloth isn't dark enough. Easy fix, but just a little problem for now in a studio.
    Error #2 - failure at first taco method try. Loaded and shot 2 holders. Taco'd without any hair ties/bands/anything. 2 developed fine (not turned out fine, see error #1), 2 sheets unfolded and stuck during agitation

    As far as I can tell, the actual shooting process went OK though! Obviously can't be sure lol.

    Oh well, live and learn. And I'm glad we're using Arista.edu sheets, so this whole exercise cost about $2 - or less than the gas for her to get to school.

    I figure this will either help people getting ready to shoot, or will give more experienced shooters a good chuckle

  2. #2
    Adrian Twiss's Avatar
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    Not a chuckle (that would be rude) but a quiet shaking of the head as it brings back some of my LF screw ups. I too have loaded film back to front. My first efforts were ruined because I was sloppy about darkslide cleanliness. I feel your wife's pain. Next time it will be better I'm sure.

  3. #3
    mjs
    mjs is offline

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    Don't feel bad. Like the rest of us, you'll be learning from mistakes for many years to come!

    Mike
    Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming– “Wow! What a Ride!”

    — Hunter S. Thompson

  4. #4
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Lets see, forgot to pull dark slide before making exposure(twice in a row) forgot to flip film holder, double exposed one film(see previous oops)shots that turned out from six exposures, one(sort of)slightly underexposed(forgot bellows factor). Think I'm going to laugh at you? No, but I hope you will laugh with me.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  5. #5

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    Ironically the first time I shot everything went flawless... Now the second and third time.... No joy....

  6. #6
    shnitz's Avatar
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    As I often tell my girlfriend, it's only a mistake and a waste if you never learn anything from it. Don't worry. In my old 4x5 class, we had all kinds of issues. Some people developed and got superscratched negatives from being rough. Some people got completely clear negatives, for whatever reason (didn't pull the darkslide out, didn't depress the shutter correctly, mixed up the chemical order, etc). Many pulled too hard on the ground glass, and the spring pops off. You need to disassemble the camera to fix it, and by "you" I mean the grumpy older gentleman lab tech that you were always intimidated to go to for help, especially if it was something you messed up.

    Shrug it off, and move on to the next shots. Also, never throw a piece of film away, even if it looks like you messed it up. You'd never know what kind of image you'll get off of it! I took a nighttime photo, exposed for over 5 minutes (reciprocity failure), and I didn't get a nice dark negative like I love to see. It was overall clear, with just a few hints of image visible every now and then. My professor convinced me to try to develop it. I stopped the enlarger down a bit and exposed the paper for a very long while, and a decently clear photo came out! It's inconceivable to new students how much data a 4x5 film can store. Many people with developing mistakes, etc. got usable pictures as well.

  7. #7
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shnitz View Post
    . . .

    Also, never throw a piece of film away, even if it looks like you messed it up. You'd never know what kind of image you'll get off of it!

    . . .
    Good morning;

    The comment by Shnitz about never throwing away a piece of film that seems to be useless is valid. You never know what actually might be on that exposed film.

    Linda Morabito worked on the "Navigation Team" at JPL (the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Los Angeles) for the Galileo spacecraft that was going around Jupiter. The useless photographs that the Galileo spacecraft took that were overexposed were given by the scientists to the Navigation Team because the overexposure produced little pin pricks of light on the photographs from the stars in the background. The navigators used the stars to tell where Galileo was pointed, where it was going, and what course corrections by how much they should recommend making to achieve the scientific goals that had been announced.

    One night when Linda Morabito was working alone at JPL on the useless overexposed photographs from Galileo, she noticed something on one of the photographs that also showed a part of the Jovian moon Io. Linda was not sure what it was, and there was no one around that she could discuss this with. She was not sure if she should call, or not call, and awaken one of the scientists to talk about this. She decided to wait until morning when everyone came to work.

    You cannot imagine the reaction from the "scientists" that morning when Linda Morabito showed to them what she saw on the photograph. It is easiest to say that the scientists "erupted." On the horizon of Io was the faint image of an umbrella shape from a fountain on the surface of Io. Linda Morabito had discovered that Io is the most geologically active object in the Solar System. She is now part of the history of our exploration and discovery in space.

    All because of a photograph that was the type that Shnitz accurately described as "useless."
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  8. #8

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    So today is the upteenth time I've shot lrg format and it was a disaster... Lost two cable releases... Almost lost my sekonic meter... 3 exposures I forgot to compensate for my red filter... So I decided to develop those for practice... And guess what... I thought it was foma 100 but it was actually fp+125!!!!!

    Ur not alone

  9. #9
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I never cease to be amazed at all the new ways I find to screw up LF film. Especially when I think I have finally learned to use it.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #10
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I never cease to be amazed at all the new ways I find to screw up LF film. Especially when I think I have finally learned to use it.

    Steve
    Ain't that the truth! After not shooting LF since 1998 or so, and very little film of any size, I took the Linhof out a couple of weekends ago. Forgot the filter factor once, applied the filter factor TWICE once after being distracted in the midst of calculating, and, in a totally new to me event - snapped the shutter and thought, "Humm that didn't sound right..." When I started to remove my square filter holder I saw the shutter was still open. I had managed to jam the shutter cocking lever on the old Kodak Flashmatic shutter of my 203 Ektar so that the shutter opened but didn't close until I moved the filter holder! It's always something!

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