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  1. #21
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terrence Brennan View Post
    I process 4x5 film in a 5x7 tray, which I place in an 8x10 tray to catch the chemical which sloshes over the sides.

    You can fill the 5x7 tray with developer and shuffle the film, or you can use a minimal amount of developer and use the tilt method, formerly known as ASA agitation. Either way, the 8x10 tray will catch your spilled chemical for reuse.

    If you find that a 5x7 tray in an 8x10 tray doesn't give you enough "elbow room" when shuffling, try an 11x14 tray instead.
    Why worry about catching the overflow for future use when it is already weakened from partial use and most developers are single shot once diluted. The minimal cost of developer makes it false economy to do so when it might cause you to under-develop the best image you have ever made.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  2. #22
    aaronmichael's Avatar
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    I don't think I'm going to be putting trays into other trays and all that, seeing as I'm just starting out. I want to keep it as simple as possible. I was just looking for the best agitation method, how to keep from scratching, amount of developer, type of developer...etc. And all of that has been covered for the most part so I think I'm ready to get started shooting and then develop over the weekend.

  3. #23
    aaronmichael's Avatar
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    PS - Just got bike from a nice 18.2 mile cycling ride to Freestyle and back and picked up the film (Arista EDU.Ultra ISO 100). I asked the guy if the development times were available on their website and he said yes. I checked right now and it says for a 1+1 D-76 it should be 10 minutes. However, it doesn't say whether this is for 35mm or 4x5 - does it matter?

  4. #24
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    It will be close enough. No matter what time you use, you can always tweak it a couple minutes either way if you don't get the results you want. With that film, I would err on the side of underdeveloping.
    f/22 and be there.

  5. #25
    aaronmichael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    It will be close enough. No matter what time you use, you can always tweak it a couple minutes either way if you don't get the results you want. With that film, I would err on the side of underdeveloping.
    Thanks for the tip.

  6. #26
    mjs
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    Lots of good advice -- developing B&W sheet film is a simple enough process that there's plenty of room for variation. If it were me...

    I'd start by processing the first few sheets one at a time until I've convinced myself that I've got the basic process down -- developer time, stop, fix, wash. In my experience, most scratches on film are a result of a corner of one sheet dragging against the surface of another while they're being shuffled, or in washing, so just sloshing one sheet in a tray, emulsion side up, really minimizes the chances of scratching.

    Once I have some nicely done negatives under my belt, I'd process two films together in a tray. I would process them face down because, in my ugly hands, I get fewer scratches than I get with the emulsion side face up. Your mileage may vary! Once I manage to eliminate scratches with two sheets, I'd go to four sheets at a time. With four sheets, I'd want at least a quart of developer in an 8x10 tray in order to have sufficient depth of solution to help prevent scratches. You can probably use less solution in a 5x7 tray but I wouldn't know as I don't have any 5x7 trays. I use one quart because the T-max film I use really, really likes FRESH D-76. I mix D-76 a gallon at a time and as soon as it's mixed, decant into four one-quart bottles, filled to the brim and tightly capped. D-76 keeps for a long time that way. A quart of D-76 will develop 16 4x5 films, so I try to hold off processing until I have about that many sheets to process, but that's just me, 'cause I'm cheap. I normally process 8-12 sheets at a time but I've been doing this long enough that I have lots of practice. The more practice you get, the better you get at it, the fewer scratches you'll have, and the more sheets of film you can process at once. Good luck and have fun!

    Mike
    Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming– “Wow! What a Ride!”

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  7. #27
    aaronmichael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjs View Post
    Lots of good advice -- developing B&W sheet film is a simple enough process that there's plenty of room for variation. If it were me...

    I'd start by processing the first few sheets one at a time until I've convinced myself that I've got the basic process down -- developer time, stop, fix, wash. In my experience, most scratches on film are a result of a corner of one sheet dragging against the surface of another while they're being shuffled, or in washing, so just sloshing one sheet in a tray, emulsion side up, really minimizes the chances of scratching.

    Once I have some nicely done negatives under my belt, I'd process two films together in a tray. I would process them face down because, in my ugly hands, I get fewer scratches than I get with the emulsion side face up. Your mileage may vary! Once I manage to eliminate scratches with two sheets, I'd go to four sheets at a time. With four sheets, I'd want at least a quart of developer in an 8x10 tray in order to have sufficient depth of solution to help prevent scratches. You can probably use less solution in a 5x7 tray but I wouldn't know as I don't have any 5x7 trays. I use one quart because the T-max film I use really, really likes FRESH D-76. I mix D-76 a gallon at a time and as soon as it's mixed, decant into four one-quart bottles, filled to the brim and tightly capped. D-76 keeps for a long time that way. A quart of D-76 will develop 16 4x5 films, so I try to hold off processing until I have about that many sheets to process, but that's just me, 'cause I'm cheap. I normally process 8-12 sheets at a time but I've been doing this long enough that I have lots of practice. The more practice you get, the better you get at it, the fewer scratches you'll have, and the more sheets of film you can process at once. Good luck and have fun!

    Mike
    Thanks for all the information Mike! Speaking of fresh D-76, I'm a student and so I do all my work at our school lab. The D-76 and HC-110 that we have are premixed and in a cylindrical plastic tank. Should I use this when developing or should I ask them if I can mix my own? If I mixed my own then I know it would be fresh. I don't know how this applies to the Arista films though, maybe it doesn't matter as much as the T-Max films you use.

  8. #28
    Terrence Brennan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    Why worry about catching the overflow for future use when it is already weakened from partial use and most developers are single shot once diluted. The minimal cost of developer makes it false economy to do so when it might cause you to under-develop the best image you have ever made.
    True, but I replenish my developers, and I keep the storage bottles topped to the brim.

    At the end of a developing session, after adding the correct amount of replenisher to the bottle, I top it off with used developer; any excess is discarded. If I am processing more film than the volume of developer in my tray can accommodate, then I replenish as I go.

  9. #29
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    8 oz for a single sheet is the minimum if you don't want to run into under-development problems from developer exhaustion at some time.
    That is very safe, but I disagree that it is a minimum. 8 oz. of D-76 will easily develop 80 sq-in of emulsion, or four sheets of 4x5, even at 1:1. I believe Kodak states a 4 oz. minimum of stock per roll, so 8 oz. can actually do eight sheets. And that can be halved, unofficially, and complete development achieved. When D-76 was my main developer, I used it 1:1 or 1:3 in trays for a single sheet, with 8 oz. working solution per sheet, with no problems at all.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  10. #30
    aaronmichael's Avatar
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    Skipped biology class today because I was so excited that I finally got the film this morning and of course I wanted to shoot at least one sheet of it. Took me a few minutes to get the film loaded into the holder. Went outside with the camera, took the shot, and went back into the darkroom and developed. The shot was shot at 1/30th, f/11, ISO 100. I pre soaked for 1 minute, developed for 5 minutes using HC-110 dilution B with agitation by lifting the tray every 15 seconds, water as a stop bath, and 20 minutes in the fixer. Overall, I'm pretty happy with how it came out. I just need to be more careful handling the film because there are permanent finger prints all over the left side of the image. Maybe I'll look into getting some gloves. I scanned the photo at 2400 dpi after it was dry and I was AMAZED at the level of detail that a 4x5 negative holds.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/aaronmi...in/photostream

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