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  1. #21
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Umm, is glass natural?

    PE

  2. #22
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    I got it!!! A pinhole camera made from a Trader Joe's oatmeal box, and pinhole made from ... humm thinking natural pin-hole... how about a .... bat wing ... yes a tanned bat wing with a tiny hole in it.

  3. #23
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    Some time ago I proposed using the lens from the eyeball of a dead cow but I never got around to it

    Anyway, let's not forget that roll and sheet film are petrochemical products. You can run it through a hand-finished wooden box camera and that fact still remains. So if you want to go natural as some narrowly define it, then I guess you have to shoot anthotypes in that wooden box.

    As for me, I consider all materials with the exception of spam and the transuranic elements to be natural and perfectly acceptable for camera building.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  4. #24
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    I actually tried to use a lens from an animal eye for something in JR high. I went cloudy after just 24 hours.

    I thought about posting this too.

  5. #25

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    You might consider making your own. I recently found this link:

    http://home.online.no/~gjon/jgcam.htm

    It's a complete how-to on making a monorail type LF camera. It's mostly made of wood and all other materials. I think he used brass for most metal parts and aluminum for railing. It'll be heavy but I'm sure you can use steel for the rail if you wanted. I'm not quite sure what criteria you are using to define "natural" but this way, you get to dictate what goes into every part of the camera.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #26
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  7. #27
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    I suspect that if you could accurately assess the true environmental impact of the materials in a camera you will find that "modern" materials like MDF are better than traditional materials.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  8. #28
    bryanphoto
    Thanks for the link to the book on making the monorail large format camera. That is an interesting idea. I imagine, like you mention, that it would be possible to use steel for the rail, or even wood. The camera looks quite nice overall. Sounds like a fun idea.
    Last edited by bryanphoto; 04-30-2011 at 10:16 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29

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    I once made a pinhole camera out of a frozen turkey.
    I'm not doing that again.

  10. #30

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    I think you'll find that despite copper being a micronutrient, it is actually much more toxic than aluminum.

    Only in recent years has the lead content of brass been reduced. It is often above 2% lead especially for older brass alloys.

    Leather tanning most certainly has a very poor record of environmentalism. Especially older than several decades ago.

    This seems to be a slight variation on the vegetarian photographic film issue.

    By the way, I've seen beach sand (silica) labelled as being considered a carcinogen in the State of California? The funny thing is I've only seen it labelled that way on laboratory grade beach sand, and not actually at the beaches in California...
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

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