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  1. #11

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    Second the tray method. I can do up to 10 4x5's in 1500cc of HC110 1:65 in an 8x10 tray, with no scratches or even a hint of uneven development. As mjs mentions, a number of reasons to work this way, if it appeals to you. There are some things to observe in the work flow, though, to optimize the process, at least, for me. I can elaborate if you are interested.

  2. #12

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    I'm interested. I've got 20 sheets of 4X5's in the freezer from a recent trip, I think there's some good stuff there, but actually I am hesitant to process because of past mishaps. Indeed, the problems lie in workflow.

  3. #13

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    In addition to the info you will receive in this thread, there has to be a lot of information in the archives, as this is a common question. Check them out.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #14

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    When I first got into LF, I tried the tray method and all of my film came out all scratched up. A friend gave me some film to try in the light to see what was going on. Even with the lights on and being very careful it too became scratched.
    I built my own little tank that develops one sheet at a time. I found the instructions here at this website: http://www.btinternet.com/~g.a.patte...lfdevelop.html Was easy to build and it works fine.
    Tareq, What developer are you using or planning on using?

  5. #15

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    Well, i wouldn't mind using the tray if my bathroom was better designed or say if i have a better place to do developing by trays, i don't have any high level base stand to put my trays on, so i was forced to sit down to my side to do developing which i hate to do that position, it wasn't comfortable at all, so i was thinking about another method where i don't need to sit down and just develop in the sink [i do that with 35mm/MF tanks] standing up.
    @cj8281: I was using D76 but it is running out, so i am looking to buy TMAX as it is the first developer i used and it gave me better results than D76 and feel it is easier to mix than the D76, but i see many many people using HC-110, so i put that as my next soon developer if not TMAX, i have XTOL/Diafine/1D-11/Microphen all in box unopened, but i am not planning to use any of them soon, i hate mixing for working solution, but i will use them later in the future when i will shoot more film, for now i better buy a ready liquid developer and my options mostly go for TMAX and new to me HC110.
    Last edited by TareqPhoto; 05-15-2011 at 01:00 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16

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    Couldn't you build a small shelf that would fit over the sink? It wouldn't have to be to large even to hold 3- 8X10 trays side by side it should be less than 30"
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    Couldn't you build a small shelf that would fit over the sink? It wouldn't have to be to large even to hold 3- 8X10 trays side by side it should be less than 30"

    That is a good idea, i will check if i can buy or get any board that can be placed on the sink so i can put on the trays, i think this will solve one problem though, will give it a try and see.

  8. #18
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    For 4x5 I use the Yankee daylight tank.

    It's easy to load, requires a modest amount of chemistry (~1600ml), and can process 12 sheets at a time.

    Loading obviously must be done in complete darkness, but can be done in a changing bag. Everything else is done in normal room light.

    For tray development, use smallish trays, not much larger than the film. I definitely prefer the Cescolite trays with the bumps on the bottom.
    Process emulsion down and agitate by lifting the bottom sheet out of the tray and putting it down on top of the stack. With a bit of practice you should have no scratches at all.

    I develop all of my 8x10 film in trays because there's no good alternative. I've had no problem with scratches on that film. 4x5 should be much easier.


    - Leigh
    Last edited by Leigh B; 05-21-2011 at 11:38 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19
    mrbishi's Avatar
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    For my 4x5's I use a mod photographic insert for a 3 reel Patterson tank. I can do 6 sheets at once and get away with using 10ml of Rodinal each time (1:100 stand developed). Brilliant piece of kit!
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didnít do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover"

    - Mark Twain

  10. #20

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    I've always used (for B/W) one of those daylight developing tanks.
    they cost about $30 and hold a bit of film.
    well, 12 sheets.
    you can't invert the tank, you just slide it back and forth.
    and, if someone opens the lid and leaves it off for a minute, your film isn't totally destroyed (happened to me. i still can print acceptable photos from the negs.)
    http://freestylephoto.biz/4945-Yanke...eveloping-Tank
    yeah, you can't process a lot of film at a time, nor give each sheet the great individual attention, but for general purpose, it's great.

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