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  1. #1

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    Large Format developing methods

    Hi,

    I would like to ask a short question in a long detailed explanation so you can answer me better way.

    I started to shoot LF last year, but i was worry how to develop the sheets, i used the lab to develop my first 4 sheets and i did it myself at home for the fifth one, the lab is a bit pricey for B&W [color is just fine], and i developed at home by trays, this method was painful and i hated, and i ended up with a neg having scratches [not sure from the developing or from something else].

    I bought BTZS tubes, and i bought HP Combi-Plan, i didn't use both yet as i need many things to know before i do, but i really don't know how and where i can find the answer i need to start, so that i will ask the question.

    I read a lot that Jobo system is nice and recommended for processing film for Lf or even MF, but people just answer me thinking i live in USA or Europe and can afford Jobo somewhere, i live in UAE and even if i use websites i can't find JOBO and i don't think the shipping option helping me at all to order one anywhere in the world, so i make this JOBO option out, wish this JOBO is still in production so i can buy it from some websites such as Freestyle or B&H or Amazon and so.

    Now the question is, what is the best method for processing LF for me in my situation? BTZS video links is not helpful enough, the talking instructor is a bit not so clear for me, i may need another one with more detailed one and slower more clear speaking so i can understand all the steps one by one, also the last question is, what is the dilution amounts for the dev/stop bath, and fixer for BTZS and Combi-Plan if i use any? i want to know the amount accurate or math way rather than some saying you can use drops or use 1/4 for dev and so, i prefer to tell me use 74.59372ml than just saying use little amount to the water, little amounts or drops i may not do it properly and i am not sure if it will work really, i was not sure at all when i mixed for trays, it worked but i can't remember now what i did if i used drops or certain amount, is there anywhere telling me how much dilution i need to mix chemicals in LF processing methods? HP Combi-Plan i was not sure if i want to use it because i heard many say they have leaking and the amount of 1L is too much, but i found that i can develop 6 sheets at once in 1L, so this may be a good option than just develop 1-2 in 1L, also i don't know about the washing method for all those methods above, can you answer me in more details step by step please? My English level is not that great to understand 1-2 lines only or short sentences of answers.

  2. #2

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    hi tareq

    deep tanks is a no brainer,
    easy and works every time
    the only down side is learning how
    to do it, and standing in the dark for 10 mis ...
    there is a way to put the film in,
    and out and if you have a bad hanger you have
    trouble like anything else ... but it is a great method.

    you can use plastic food storage bins instead of the large
    deep tanks, and hangers cost about 2-6$ each ...

    good luck !
    john

    ps you can process rollfilm on a coat hanger, the same way ...
    in the same developer ...
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    hi tareq

    deep tanks is a no brainer,
    easy and works every time
    the only down side is learning how
    to do it, and standing in the dark for 10 mis ...
    there is a way to put the film in,
    and out and if you have a bad hanger you have
    trouble like anything else ... but it is a great method.

    you can use plastic food storage bins instead of the large
    deep tanks, and hangers cost about 2-6$ each ...

    good luck !
    john

    ps you can process rollfilm on a coat hanger, the same way ...
    in the same developer ...
    Thank you John.
    I have a Paterson deep Reel 3 tank, i may give that a go and see.

  4. #4

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    If you're shooting 4X5, an easy method would be using the Jobo film tank with the 4X5 reels and loader. I understand you're in the UAE
    You don't need the machine since you can use a flat surface to roll the tank on. Everything considered it should be relatively inexpensive to ship lol
    The answer you may not want to hear is learn to tray process. ALL of the older statesmen of photography did this and it's a matter of practice. A lot of practice!

    I think John may be referring to deep tanks, that hold a large volume of liquid. They're usually stainless or hard rubber and the film is held in a SS frame and dunked into the chemistry.
    You may find picture of them on Ebxy
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  5. #5
    shootsingh's Avatar
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    HP worked fine for me. I used ilford developer id11 mixed 1:1
    HP is a good system but the jobo expert tank 3010 cannot be beaten.
    You can buy one on ebay for less than £200 ask the seller in advance for the delivery to your country.
    Or new one is from uk £325 approx. From www.firstcallphotography.
    You dont need jobo machine, as said earlier, you can roll it on floor or,
    Fill a little tub of water and float the drum in water and rotate it.

    If you are serious about quality of development then jobo 3010 is the only option (in my opinion) i have used all tricks but nothing beats this drum. Its dream to load and easy to develop and you will save lot of chemical. 50% saving compared to hp.

    You can always add jobo processor cpp-2 or cpa-2 in future. if you want a new one, can be ordered from germany for about £1500.
    But jobo 3010 is the way to go.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    If you're shooting 4X5, an easy method would be using the Jobo film tank with the 4X5 reels and loader. I understand you're in the UAE
    You don't need the machine since you can use a flat surface to roll the tank on. Everything considered it should be relatively inexpensive to ship lol
    The answer you may not want to hear is learn to tray process. ALL of the older statesmen of photography did this and it's a matter of practice. A lot of practice!

    I think John may be referring to deep tanks, that hold a large volume of liquid. They're usually stainless or hard rubber and the film is held in a SS frame and dunked into the chemistry.
    You may find picture of them on Ebxy
    i was referring to DEEP tanks, tanks john
    sorry i wasn't clear ...
    when i didn't have any, i used 3 quart food storage containers
    and they fit shingle-sheet hangers ...

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum379/...g-hangers.html

    i agree, that tray processing works very well .. i gave up the tanks/hangers
    years ago and until recently processed all my film in trays ...

    food-storage trays work well for that too, and they usually come with lids

    - john
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  7. #7

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    Well, thank you very much!

  8. #8

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    I recently purchased one of these from morgan,
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mt_Lzd3LUnQ

    They have gotten some really good press on these forums. I'm getting ready to try it out, I'm currently using some 35mm film to test the best developing time. I'll be trying in the next few weeks.

  9. #9
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    I always used a slosher tray. It holds 6 4x5 sheets in an 11x14 tray. Works very well.

  10. #10
    mjs
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    I hate to sound like an old fuddy-duddy, but developing sheet film in trays is something which I feel is useful even if it isn't what you do when you have lots of film. There's nothing like the flexibility and control you get developing one or a few sheets at a time, and should it become necessary, developing by inspection simply can not be bettered. There is no superior method of developing film.

    That said, it's also slow and fussy. In our day and age, most of us want a faster, easier solution that's almost as good. Tray development also requires practice and regular reenforcement and lots of us aren't very fond of that idea, either. But at the least, if you already have the trays (for printing, perhaps,) I suggest that you would be better off learning to process at least a few sheets of film in trays, just in case. Experience is always the best teacher and with it you can at least make informed decisions.

    Mike
    Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming– “Wow! What a Ride!”

    — Hunter S. Thompson

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