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  1. #1
    Tom Nutter's Avatar
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    Synchro-compur question

    I have been looking around for a Super-Angulon 90 f8.

    Before I buy....

    It seems a common trait of the Synchro-Compur shutters that often come with this lens, that the slower shutter speeds are often sluggish or not working. I'm fairly handy, and not afraid to take stuff apart, but I am not a repair guy either.

    Is this problem usually a quick fix with some lighter fluid, or a more involved repair?....Generally speakng of course.
    Last edited by Tom Nutter; 05-05-2011 at 12:08 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    It is best to assume that the shutter will need a proper cleaning etc. This involves extracting, dismantling, cleaning, and reassembling the slow speed gear train. Budget for it. If the lens' price plus likely cost of overhaul, including shipping to and from the shop, exceeds the price of one in a known good shutter, don't get it.

    Also, not all gummy Synchro-Compurs can be made right. I have a couple that turned out to be unfixable.

  3. #3

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    I've had two Synchro-Compur shutters that developed the low-speed paralysis, both Linhof lenses, if that makes any difference. In the one case, I sent it out for CLA and it was fine for the first three months, but after I had not used it for the winter ( about 6 months - this is Canada), the slow speeds became sluggish again.

    I applied frequent exercise, just sitting there cocking and firing the shutter repeatedly while watching TV, and all speeds returned to fully functional after a couple of evenings.

    The second lens was acquired at a flea market, stiffened up to a terrible state, and I was able to get that one completely functional with the same treatment of exercise, aided by an initial couple of drops of naptha (lighter fluid) and a blast of ether.

    Both are still working fine, but I continue to exercise them regularly. That's been about ten years now.

  4. #4

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    Synchro-Compur #00 or #0? If the shutter is a #00 that means you have very little hope of replacing the shutter if it breaks totally. That being said I have a 90mm SA with a #00 Synchro-Compur and it was a little slow at 1 second. I opened the shutter up, took out the timing gears soaked them in naptha and applied a tiny bit of oil with a toothpick. It works great now. I don't recommend fixing it yourself though unless you've worked on shutters before. #00s are especially hard to work on because they are tiny.

  5. #5
    Tom Nutter's Avatar
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    Hoping for a #0, not a #00.

  6. #6

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    If you want to service the shutter yourself, the following link gives you all information about compur shutters:
    http://www.suaudeau.eu/memo/rep/Comp...ir-manual.html

  7. #7
    Tom Nutter's Avatar
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    Thanks for that!

  8. #8

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    This is a good link to- specific instructions for the Synchro-Compur. The nice thing about the #00 is that it is smaller and lighter. Makes the Super Angulon more backpackable for sure.

  9. #9
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    I would not recommend attempting repair of any shutter.

    I'm a trained camera repair tech and have repaired many of them.
    It requires skill, patience, and training, plus proper tools, equipment, and chemicals.

    Send it to someone who specializes in such repairs.

    One of the keys to a proper CLA is the use of the correct lubricant in the escapement. That apparently did not happen in the instance mentioned by the gentleman in Canada.

    Lubricants can be expensive. The Nye Astro Oil that I use cost $90 per ounce.

    - Leigh
    Last edited by Leigh B; 05-21-2011 at 11:57 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10
    Tom Nutter's Avatar
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    I would not recommend attempting repair of any shutter.
    Heh...If you only knew of the things I have taken apart in my lifetime, for better or worse....but yes, If you want it to be up to spec and work right every time, then I agree 100%. Still, there is nothing wrong with tinkering as long as you know your limits.



 

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