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  1. #21
    mrbishi's Avatar
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    +1 for what Wyno said.

    In my LowePro 28lt pack I use a generic soft camera bag insert similar to this which fits around my 4x5 perfectly (take out the middle insert of course):



    and then I have a few zip up cushioned protective cells like this (one holds my double darks, another the misc items like loupe, meter, level etc.)

    My dark hood, and other miscellaneous items have there place in the pack (water is via a camelback, food and other field tools/safety items go into the various pockets in the pack itself or on the shoulder webbing).




    My tripod then attaches to the back of the pack with webbing.

  2. #22
    Tom Nutter's Avatar
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    In my LowePro 28lt pack I use a generic soft camera bag insert similar to this which fits around my 4x5 perfectly (take out the middle insert of course):
    Without looking first....where do you get something like that?

  3. #23
    mrbishi's Avatar
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    eBay

    I'm going to pickup one of these tomorrow from a local outdoors shop to see how it goes.



    It should be spot on size wise to fit in my pack with a lot of gear - will post a picture once I get it.
    Last edited by mrbishi; 05-18-2011 at 03:12 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didnít do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover"

    - Mark Twain

  4. #24

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    Look at http://www.photobackpacker.com/home.asp. It may give you some ideas for your pack.

  5. #25
    Shaggysk8's Avatar
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    I have a ruck sack with lenses and food, a shoulder bag with books, pens, light meter, filters and other bits, Sinar C on tripod over the shoulder, weighs a bout 15kg and I can walk for ever, keep it simple!

  6. #26

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    Smaller and Lighter is Better

    This topic comes up occasionally, and it never fails to amaze me how much stuff people carry around just in order to carry around their cameras and lenses, etc. While strollers have some advantages, backpacks seem to me to be unwieldy. They need to be taken off and laid on the ground (not to mention all the packing material some of you seem to use...) where things can get dirty and/or blown away by wind.

    I carry a Wista DX, 5 lenses, 6-8 film holders, Pentax Digital Spotmeter, 10+ filters in two sizes, dark cloth, barn doors, exposure record, flashlights, tripod, loupes, 4x glasses, sunglasses and other misc. accessories in a fanny pack, a fly-fishing vest and a small over the shoulder pouch.

    I make custom-sized boxes with open tops for the lenses out of corrugated cardboard. Otherwise, things just go in pockets and pouches.

    The Wista DX with a lens folded inside goes in the fanny pack along with three other lenses in their home-made cardboard boxes. Also in the fanny pack go two folding pouches with 6 filters each, sizes 52mm and 67mm. One goes in the main compartment with camera and lenses, one in the front zipper pouch. I've got some other stuff in the front zipper pouch as well. The rolled-up dark cloth is strapped onto the outside of the pack.

    A short fly-fishing vest carries accessories, viewing filter, flashlight, Pentax meter, cleaning stuff, tape measure, loupe and a bunch of other smaller stuff. The filmholders and exposure notebook along with another small lens goes into a small over-the-shoulder pouch. The tripod goes in a hand, or gets strapped onto the bottom of the fanny pack for scrambling. In rough terrain, I carry a collapsible ski-pole for extra stability and my roofing gloves. Often, I carry a small pair of binoculars and my Garmin GPS as well.

    When I set up, nothing has to touch the ground, with the exception of the tripod. I set up the tripod and then hang the filmholder pouch on the center-column tightening knob. The fanny pack has a shoulder strap that I wear cross-body, so when the belt is unbuckled it simply swings to one side and functions as an over-the-shoulder bag; easy to work out of. My meter and viewing filter are tethered to rings on the fly-fishing vest so I can't drop them.

    The whole kit weighs in at around 22 lbs. I carry an f/8 SA 90mm, Nikkor W 135mm, Ektar 203mm, Fuji A 240mm and a Nikkor M 300mm for the most part. I alternate in a Fuji SW 75mm at times and leave the 300mm out when I'm anticipating wider views. I usually strap on a bottle of water and toss in a sandwich as well for longer trips unless my beautiful assistant is with me, carrying those things and possibly a lens or two extra :-)

    Here's a link to the kit "in action" on the Oregon Coast:

    http://www.doremusscudder.com/?m=9&s=40

    This set-up is good for long day hikes (I've done 20+ miles with it often). When out backpacking, I cut down the kit to 3 lenses, use Mido holders instead and somehow strap everything to my main pack, or get it inside somehow. Then, after "base camp" is set up. I use the reduced-size kit for day excursions.

    Since I started carrying this set-up in 1983, I have never damaged a camera or a lens, or anything else for that matter, in transport. I lost a loupe that squeezed its way out of a small pocket in the vest once in a very and scraping descent through a steep ravine; I use a different pocket now... (I did drop my meter once before I decided to tether it on, and I've rolled a polarizer or two down a steep hill from time to time, but these had nothing to do with the carrying...) I worry about slipping and falling backward some time, smashing some gear, but have been lucky so far. Besides, a backpack has the same problem.

    I do have a larger internal-frame pack for my Zone VI camera kit which includes more and longer lenses, but I rarely take it on extended trips.

    Hope this helps lighten the load somewhat.

    Doremus Scudder

    www.DoremusScudder.com

  7. #27

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    Tom, the colours will amaze you. It's just a shame for you guys in the US that our dollar is so high at the moment. It's sort of the reverse of what us Aussies have had to put up with for a couple of decades. If you've been watching Oprah, you know what she thinks of Oz now, so you should come on down. There's quite a few LF shooters in Melbourne and I know that they had a get together for Ralph Lambrecht when he was here a month or so ago. We are friendly folk.
    I used to use foam rubber like Old Biker Pete, but I found that it was a bit too floppy for me, which is why I swapped to polystyrene. I have my 8x10 in the back pack proper in the top compartment and my light meter, cable release, blower brush. filters etc in the small compartment at the bottom of the bag (enclosed in hard foam-compartmentalised), and then I have my film holders in the daypack attached to the main backpack. I carry my tripod in my hand and swap when my hand gets tired.
    Good luck with whatever route yuo choose.
    Mike

  8. #28
    mrbishi's Avatar
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    IMO there is absolutely nothing wrong with taking off a backpack. Heck you're shooting large format it's not like you're in a hurry. I'd much rather have all the weight off my person while I setup, compose and shoot rather than carrying 22lbs in a vest etc.

    Anyway the OP was asking about his PACK not about strollers or vests or anything else...
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didnít do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover"

    - Mark Twain

  9. #29
    jp80874's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrbishi View Post
    .

    Anyway the OP was asking about his PACK not about strollers or vests or anything else...
    I took it to be a mixed message because he also said, "without slipping a disk?"

    That is the reason at an age when my doctor said I should no longer carry this amount of weight any distance, I went to a stroller.

    John Powers, carrying a much larger camera and pack, 3-4 miles, at age 71
    "If you want to be famous, you must do something more badly than anybody in the entire world." Miroslav Tichż

  10. #30

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    My pack for the job is an old Jansport Equinox, smaller than your ALICE but contains everything quite snuggily: 5x7 Speed Graphic, light meter, cloth, loupe, filter kit, three holders, extra lens & cables, plus I like the light gray color---I think Anssel Adams wrote something about light colors being cooler.

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