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  1. #31

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Baltimore
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    133
    I just throw (gently, of course) my stuff in a camelbak day pack. I wrap the folded camera in the darkcloth (sweatshirt) and put it in the main pocket. the two lenses go in a smaller pocket at the top. The film holders go in the pocket with no zipper. The tripod fits in one of the side waterbottle holders and goes under the straps that tighten everything down, and the meter and lupe goes on the other side.

    I've made an effort to buy the lightest camera and lens and tripod that I can find so the whole setup (with the full 3 liters of water) can't weigh much more than 20 pounds.

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Oregon and Austria
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    833
    mrbishi,

    I can take off my fanny pack and lay it on the ground whenever I want to. But when its wet, snowy, muddy, or I'm up to my ankles in saltwater, I can leave it slung over my shoulder and work out of it comfortably; impossible with a backpack. I find this a great advantage over conventional backpacks, which is why I advocated it (maybe the OP has a fanny pack...). I often take everything off, including the vest, when setting up when conditions are favorable and I have lots of time. However, I find my set-up superior to a backpack for the transport and for more extreme conditions (both weather and terrain) when doing landscape photography and a lot of hiking away from civilization. It is better balanced, easier to scramble over rough terrain with and easier and faster to work with in unfavorable weather or when laying the pack on the ground would be undesirable.

    Point taken, however, that my post was a bit off-topic. Hopefully my comments about building cardboard boxes for the lenses helped the OP a bit. Maybe the following will help too:

    Here in Europe, when city-photographing, I carry my gear in a rolling backpack (with extendable handle and shoulder straps) that doubles as a carry-on when flying. I normally wear it on my back when walking the cities (who needs all that vibration from cobblestones, etc.) or when bicycling, but do roll it on smooth surfaces in airports, museums, etc.

    For this set-up, I have homemade corrugated cardboard boxes with open tops for the 4x5 camera and four lenses (slip-on tops would be an easy thing to make if needed). The lenses are stacked around the camera box, two on one side, two in front. I find the boxes rigid and sturdy enough to not only protect everything, but to help partition the pack and keep things from rattling around. Filmholders are slipped in front as well. I can carry 6-8 easily at a time, which is usually enough for a day's shoot for me. Extras are at home or in the hotel. My spotmeter goes on top of the camera in its protective case, filters and accessories go in a front zippered pocket. Darkcloth goes in the main compartment strategically placed to keep things from rattling around. Tripod is in my hand or on the bicycle rack. I set the pack directly under the tripod when working for easy access.

    Hope this helps too,

    Doremus Scudder
    www.DoremusScudder.com

  3. #33
    mrbishi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    23
    That's fair enough - it's great you've found something that works for you.

    Just to bring up a few points - most decent packs have built in rain covers which makes it easy to put down even in the messiest of weather (unless you are wading). I also hang my pack under my full size tripod for extra stability. I can easily slide mine across and wear it across my front and access everything I need from the top (assuming the camera is mounted to the tripod already).

    I'll usually carry a few double darks in my jacket in cooler weather when out an about. With the camera mounted to the tripod all that I need access to is a loupe, meter and dark cloth which is easy to get out of a pack.

    In the end it boils down to what suits the individual the best. My pack is designed to be worn long distances hiking and I've never found it uncomfortable at all (though I am probably a fair bit younger than a lot on this forum).
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didnít do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover"

    - Mark Twain

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