Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,338   Posts: 1,537,710   Online: 780
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    Reinhold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Washougal, Washington
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    681
    Images
    14

    Photagraphy's first lens, the Wollaston Meniscus

    Since I started playing with meniscus lenses a while ago, I've learned that they were the first true lenses designed for photography. Back in 1812, a chap named William Wollaston layed the groundwork for the glass we use today.

    It's a super simple design and gives a fascinating peek back to the early days of putting an image onto a piece of paper. Here are two examples taken with my 5x7 Deardorff using my 250 mm lens, One was wide open at f:5.6, and the other was stopped down to f:16. Both are appealing examples of photography over 100 years ago.

    Here's the lens that I used:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum379/...scus-lens.html

    Reinhold
    www.classicBWphoto.com
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Gazebo250PMN@f5.6..170.jpg   Gazebo 250pmn@f16..155.jpg  

  2. #2
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,418
    Images
    2
    Very interesting indeed.

    This raises an interesting question... what types of lenses were used on camera obscuras back in 17th-18th century?
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    235
    Wow! What would be really interesting is to see:

    a pinhole
    This lens wide open, stopped down
    A modern 250(ish)mm wide open, stopped down

  4. #4
    artonpaper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    325
    Images
    135
    I can't give you a source at the moment since my books are packed away for our upcoming move. But there were compound lenses used in the camera obscura. There were even designs to rectify the inverted image without the use of mirrors. One book that comes to mind was a book about Ver Meer's use of the camera obscura. It may have been called Ver Meer's Camera.

  5. #5
    zsas's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,959
    Images
    74
    Very nice info! Would a subject, at say 10 feet from the lens, be sharp if shot wide open or would it look like that sample (ie dreamy and soft)? I love both those photos!! Thanks for the share!

  6. #6
    Reinhold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Washougal, Washington
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    681
    Images
    14
    I don't have an example of wide-open portraits with these lenses that I can post. Typically I've used f:8, mostly because my subjects prefer some (relative) sharpness in their portraits.

    Here are some examples shot at f:8 ...

    Reinhold

    www.classicBWphoto.com
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Jim @ 96.jpg   Judy4x5@220.jpg   Larry @96.jpg   Susan @170.jpg  

  7. #7
    zsas's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,959
    Images
    74
    These are glorious portraits! The one of Larry is my fav of the set! Great info and photos!

  8. #8
    Neanderman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ohio River Valley
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    575
    It appears you are using a forward mount? Have you played with turning the lens around and using it behind the aperture? That became the favored way to mount simple, meniscus elements.

    Ed
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  9. #9
    Reinhold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Washougal, Washington
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    681
    Images
    14
    I am using the classic Wollaston design. The meniscus lens is placed behind the aperture stop cards, with the concave face of the lens facing the subject. The location of slot for the stops is 10~15% of the focal length in front of the lens.

    Here's how Wiki shows it...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camera_..._camera_lenses

    The lens barrel is quite deep, so there's a very effictive lens hood inherent in the design.

    Reinhold

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    local
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,172
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    9
    thanks for the link !
    and it is great to see another person using
    these old designs

    john
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin