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  1. #1

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    Copy camera into Large Format

    I have just put my hands into a partial copy camera , without lens or film back, as per the picture bellow:



    Bellows is light tight and extends from 2.5 inches to a maximum of 15 inches (fully extended). An 8x10 film holder can be easily adapted to the back and i have many inherited large format lenses of various focal lenghts available.
    My question is: What kind of Large format camera can i build if i decide not to machine the camera to allow movements? Close-ups? Landscapes?

  2. #2

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    It is a nice looking camera.

    All of my large format cameras have movements - but in reality I don't use them very much at all.

    For landscapes a little tilt, either of the lens-board or the back, is desirable to control depth of field at large apertures. Rising front is also useful to lose that pesky unwanted foreground. Both desirable, but not essential. I'd say 8 out of 10 of the pictures I take use no movements. Photographers in studios probably use a lot more (and those who are a lot better than me ;-)

    The bigger limiting factor here, IMHO, is not movements, it is the bellows extension. A standard lens for 10 X 8" is 12" or so. So, only 3" of movement. For portraits it might be nice to use a longer lens, which leaves little or no extension for focussing... It would work for copying and close ups because you could get adequate coverage with a shorter lens. Most 6" lenses designed for 5 X 4 would cover 10 X 8 easily if doing a close up, you'd need 12" extension for 1:1 - but then the camera is limited to only doing close ups...

    Personally, with 15" bellows extension, I'd be thinking about sticking a 7 X 5 or 5 X 4" back onto it - that would give you a much more versatile camera. Maybe think about adding the option of rising front by fitting a lens board that can slide up a little? Is a bit of tilt a possibility? That would do for me.
    Steve

  3. #3
    Rick A's Avatar
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    First of all, pull your hands out of the camera, they belong on the outside.
    Looks like a cheap way to get your feet wet with a larger negative. Don't let the lack od movements slow you down, looks like it could be modified. Pick up a lens in the 6"-10" range with a shutter and a couple of film holders and go shoot some film.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  4. #4
    Thingy's Avatar
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    If you could rig up a reducing back (to 5x4) you might find the limited bellows draw less problematic. It would also allow you to use rollfilm backs - for extra flexibility. With a 6x9 rolfilm holder mounted you could even use an 80mm macro lens for 1:1 images, if I'm not mistaken.
    The Thing

    Portfolio

    Film Cameras currently used:
    Large/Stort-format: Ebony 45SU (field camera), Medium/Medlem-format: Mamiya 7, Hasselblad 503CW
    35mm/Små format: Nikon: F4, D800 (yes digital, I know)

  5. #5

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    I imagine you could make some fairly impressive Paper Negatives with that rig.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    First of all, pull your hands out of the camera, they belong on the outside.
    Looks like a cheap way to get your feet wet with a larger negative.
    He won't get his feet wet if he uses those hands to develop the negative.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  7. #7

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    Thank you guys for responding! Thanks Steve, your reply was spot on!

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smudger View Post
    I imagine you could make some fairly impressive Paper Negatives with that rig.
    Hi Smudger, how exactly that could be done? Pardon my ignorance.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smudger View Post
    I imagine you could make some fairly impressive Paper Negatives with that rig.
    Never mind Smudger, found the answer. But it is more of a pinhole related technique. Thanks!

  10. #10

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    Well, paper negs are not limited to pinhole techniques , they work perfectly well with conventional view cameras. You would get a superb positive contact print from a large P.N.

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