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Thread: Big Bertha

  1. #21
    Fragomeni's Avatar
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    The Star camera that started this thread looks like a 5x7 rather then a 4x5 like was already mentioned. I've head of them making them and mounting a 4x5 revolving back on them since 4x5 film was more commonly used by the photographers using these cameras. The biggest one I've seen was a 5x7 with the most absurdly large lens on it. The thing pretty much required two people to move it.

    Anyway, if anyone knows anyone interested I'm actually selling a relatively reasonably sized 4x5 Big Bertha right now. I tried offering it to the APUGers at a discount first but now its up on the auction site.
    Francesco Fragomeni
    www.FrancescoFragomeni.com

  2. #22
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vpwphoto View Post
    Here I go...

    Hogwsh! @ Goldfarb. quoting "I suspect the long lens barrels may have vignetted the image on 5x7", and they were likely to be cropping from the 4x5" frame anyway."

    The barrel is just a way to mount the lens and keep stray light out... has nothing to do with coverage. I had a similar lens (not that long of focal length) and it could illuminate WP just fine. let alone the 5x7 it was designed for.
    The lens has plenty of coverage for a much larger format than 5x7", but put it on an SLR with a long barrel, and I wouldn't be surprised if there were some mechanical vignetting at wide apertures, just because of the way the mount is constructed. It's not like having a tapered or square bellows with no obstructions between the lens and the film.
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  3. #23
    brian d's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fragomeni View Post
    Anyway, if anyone knows anyone interested I'm actually selling a relatively reasonably sized 4x5 Big Bertha right now. I tried offering it to the APUGers at a discount first but now its up on the auction site.
    I could just...
    Real men use Speed Graphics and flashbulbs.

  4. #24
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Just amazing, I wonder how it looked and sounded throwing the stick shift back and fourth and firing off a frame. Thanks for the pics and the read =]

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Trusses custom made while you wait.
    You definitely need your orthopedic underware when trying to move that beast. My 4x5 RB Auto-Graflex is bad enough.
    Michael Cienfuegos


    If you don't want to stand behind our troops, please feel free to stand in front of them.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    The lens has plenty of coverage for a much larger format than 5x7", but put it on an SLR with a long barrel, and I wouldn't be surprised if there were some mechanical vignetting at wide apertures, just because of the way the mount is constructed. It's not like having a tapered or square bellows with no obstructions between the lens and the film.
    What's needed is easy to describe for a straight tube: tube's diameter >= format's diagonal.

    A conical tube has to have diameter at rear >= format's diagonal and diameter at front >= lens' exit pupil.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Looks like that's a night game, too, which must have been even more of a challenge.
    I think it just looks like a night game because flash was used to light the dim area in the overhang were the photographers were.

    I don't know if the cameras would have been practical at all for night games - figure a f5 max aperture, film speed would probably have to be around 6400 to stop any action (and the shutter speed would probably be 1/250th at best. Were those film speeds possible then?

    Modern stadium lighting, pro venues included, can range from 1/500th, f2.8 at 3200 to 1/1000th, at 1250, give or take.

    Night games were the exception, World Series included.

  8. #28
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    What's needed is easy to describe for a straight tube: tube's diameter >= format's diagonal.

    A conical tube has to have diameter at rear >= format's diagonal and diameter at front >= lens' exit pupil.
    Exactly, and looking at how these cameras are constructed, the inside diameter of the tube is likely to be about 7", while the diagonal of the 5x7 frame is about 8.5".
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  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Exactly, and looking at how these cameras are constructed, the inside diameter of the tube is likely to be about 7", while the diagonal of the 5x7 frame is about 8.5".

    Yes, and if the tube was taken right up to the film plane there would be an image circle of 7", hence quite a bit of vignetting on a 5 X 7"

    But, the tube stops where the 'box' of the camera starts - maybe 6 inches or so from the film. From this point it can continue to expand to the size of the negative.

    As long as the cone of image forming light is still less than 7" in diameter at the point where the tube meets the body, then it shouldn't be vignetted.
    Steve

  10. #30
    manet's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot to sharing.
    I learn all days

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