Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,490   Posts: 1,542,946   Online: 892
      
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 44
  1. #21

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    165
    if i went with the cambo i would need this for older lenses: http://www.calumetphoto.co.uk/eng/pr...pal_3/386-652a

    i have seen an offer with a cambo sc and lens and 6 film holders, 2 lens boards, polaroid back and case. therefore it would all fit into a case, and i could put several prepared holders in a backpack.

    it comes down to the weight of a cambo vs a graphic view, and the fact i don't get as much extras with the graphic view. i do get a nice ilex lens though which seems capable of great stuff, looking at the photos.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    188
    here is a list of manufacturers, some still in business, some not, but do some searches and see what you find:

    Wista
    Linhof
    Horseman
    Arca Swiss
    Sinar
    Cambo
    Deardorf
    Weisner
    Canham
    Toyo
    Tachihara
    And I am sure there are others

    Most of them at one time or another made low cost models. Some have been business for a very long time and so the older models can be cheap. I would start by narrowing down to whether you want a monorail or a flatbed and the go from there.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,043
    Quote Originally Posted by chase View Post
    Lol - I was just thinking back on when I was going for m my first LF... How excited I was, I was hoping someone would point to an LF and say "Buy that one."

    But, what no one mentioned to me was - It's easy to get into LF, the camera is the easy and cheapest part. Staying in LF is the true challenge!

    I highly recommend a box of Depends to go with that first LF. For you'll find yourself dropping a load every time you find out, you forgot you need this and that. And saying "You want how much for a box of film? Processing costs what!? You're scanning the negs at only 72 for that much? 300 dpi scans are... fracking WHAT? Uuhmm... Could you excuse me a minute, I have to change my diaper..."

    But we do love it so.... and if you can "stay in" you'll love it.
    Yeah, every time I've looked at LF I look at a box of 8x10 film goimg for over a hundred bucks for TEN shots... and I'm glad the 8x10 cameras are out of my price budget too!
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  4. #24
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,814
    I agree with Wade and Chase. The first two cameras would be greatly overpriced in the USA. They are the early Graphic View, not the GV II which has a longer bellows and better front tilts. Be leery of buy-it-now prices. With patience, actual auctions usually provide better bargains. The Ektar lens is fine for much press camera use, but inadequate for view camera movements. Dan is right about the Kodak Ektar f/7.7 203mm, a fine old lens with a cult status that boosts the price. I use one more than any of many others. Similar lenses from other makers might be less expensive. The The GV tilt-pan heads are good. The GV, like many Burke & James or Calumet view cameras, use 4" square lens boards that are easy to fabricate. Don't worry about getting the perfect camera on your first purchase. If you shop carefully, you can recoup most or all of your money if you sell it to upgrade.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    165
    i definately want a monorail, and a portable one which packs into a case. i will just be using it on a tripod.

    thankyou all, and jim for the words of advice. the ilex lens seems capable of great tonality, but i'm not sure it covers 4x5. it is sold with the GV on ebay.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,390
    Quote Originally Posted by pollux View Post
    how would i make a cambo compatible with an ilex 127mm f4.5 or a tele megor 400, as they use different lens boards (i think)?
    Um, the Ilex was made for a 3x4 Press camera, barely covers 4x5. Not a good short normal lens for 4x5 because it allows no movements. There are many many more-or-less normal lenses for 4x5, Schneider Symmars (plain Symmars with no suffix) are relatively inexpensive and not bad.

    If you're determined to use the Ilex on a 4x5 Cambo, you'll have to find a Cambo lens board that's drilled to accept it -- what shutter is it in? -- or drilled smaller so the hole can be enlarge to suit. Cambo lens boards are metal castings with integral light traps, making one isn't a good idea.

    Re the 400 Tele-Megor, I checked and was surprised to learn that the lens will indeed cover 4x5. If it is shutter, you need to have it and its shutter put on a board that's been drilled to accept the shutter. If it isn't in shutter, it will be very hard to use on a Cambo because the Cambo is shutterless.

    Nearly all of us think very hard before buying pur first press, technical, or view camera. Nearly all of us learn what we really want/need by using that first camera and replace it within a year. Whatever decision you make, except not to get one at all, will probably be wrong. Go ahead, but keep that in mind.

  7. #27
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,814
    Quote Originally Posted by pollux View Post
    if i went with the cambo i would need this for older lenses: http://www.calumetphoto.co.uk/eng/pr...pal_3/386-652a. . . .
    You might need it, but you don't have to pay so much. Make your own, or have a friend do it for you. I even made one out of mat board so a friend could test a lens. Not durable, but fine for brief use.

  8. #28
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Lensboards are very easy to make. Go to a hardware store and show them what you want and they'll probably drill the right hole for you on the spot. Or just buy a holesaw kit for a drill.

    The hole sizes don't need to be perfect and you can make the boards out of wood.

    I get the giggles when I see $100+ lensboards for sale. Maybe I am in the wrong business.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  9. #29
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,814
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    . . . Nearly all of us think very hard before buying pur first press, technical, or view camera. Nearly all of us learn what we really want/need by using that first camera and replace it within a year. Whatever decision you make, except not to get one at all, will probably be wrong. Go ahead, but keep that in mind.
    I didn't think much, and started with a New Vue. Even that was enough to teach me the basics.

  10. #30

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    165
    i could make one myself with a router drill bit and some wood from a hardware store. i just set the drill to 61mm diameter and cut one.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Graflex-Gr...item256a5708ee

    how does this look?, with the advantage that the filter holder goes infront of the lens, freeing you from buying different filters for each lens.

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin