Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,687   Posts: 1,482,351   Online: 817
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 29
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    15,260
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    2
    a pacemaker and crown graphic for portrait work,
    they work very well in this way, they are press cameras
    and were built for documentary and portrait work.
    i have a 50s pacemaker and have made environmental portraits
    with it since it was purchased in 1988.
    i wouldn't consider these cameras for architectural work
    ( unless i was using a wide lens and shooting straight on )
    but for portraits, i wouldn't hesitate.

    good luck!
    john

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    NW Chicagoland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    534
    Images
    1
    Does an unmodified camera have any front swing? If setup in portrait orientation you would need to use the swing to get a tilt movement. I believe this is not available. This would limit your tilt play to landscape orientation only.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    162
    Hello Dan;
    The Super Graphic, last production model made would be my choice. Rotating back, bed drop, front standard tilts fore and aft, lateral shift, swings, and rise and fall. Otherwise an older view camera would be a good economic choice, Steven.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,194
    Steven, the Super Graphic, unlike the Pacemakers, has unlinked inner and outer bed rails. This makes focusing short focal lengths that make infinity on the inner rails very difficult. Win a little, lose a lot.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,194
    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    However, for the record, the pacemaker graphics all have tilt. You can tilt the lens board backward easily and forward tilt can be achieved by dropping the bed and tilting backward less than all the way back....but it is a pain in the ass to focus when playing this game. Just remember, with a crown/speed graphic, you don't need no stinking tilt!
    As you said, a PITA. As you didn't say, usable only with a limited range of focal lengths at a limited range of focused distances. In most situations, unusable.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    15,260
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    2
    so why it is again that one needs swings and tilts for portraits ?

  7. #17
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Dan wants tilt, let us recommend something that gives him tilt!
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  8. #18
    dpn
    dpn is offline
    dpn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    159
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    12
    Thanks all for the vibrant debate and great information.

    The point of the movements while shooting portraits is mess with the plane of focus a bit -- to add more/different out of focus areas in order to focus attention, etc. I'm already a big fan of shooting wide open on my smaller cameras; the idea would be to exaggerate the out of focus effects even more by through the use of movements. Hey, it looks "good" (or at least interesting, at least some of the time) when it's faked in digital. I'd hope to achieve a similar, but more subtle and honest, effect through movements.

    Patrick Messina's stuff here: http://www.patrickmessina.com/port.html is a good example of some of the look I'd like to recreate. If I can do them with a press camera, awesome. If I would really need the movements afforded by a view camera ... then I'm glad I'm figuring that out now!

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    15,260
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    2
    you could always use your press camera, and instead of using a normal
    lens in a lensboard, get a lensbaby, and replace their lens with one you know
    covers your 4x5 format ... and just do all your movements with the lens, rather than
    the front standard ... the photographs you linked to look like they could be recreated
    that way ... if you don't want to buy a field camera ( or rail camera ) which can give you
    more movements than barely any swing/tilt/shift from a press camera ...
    putting a lens in foamcore instead of a rigid lensboard also will give you the opportunity to
    mess around with your plane of focus as well.

    good luck !
    john

  10. #20
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,720
    Dan, I have a variety of old view and press cameras, and would chose a view camera over a press camera to duplicate Patrick Messina's style. Tilts and swings are usually easier made with the view camera. The Pacemaker series Graphics can be modified to have front swings, but this limits other functions. Contrary to what is implied in the link in your first post, the Anniversary Speed Graphic did not have front tilt. The front standard from a Pacemaker Graphic can be installed on an Anniversary to give some tilt, but that is not a completely satisfactory solution due to the greater angle of the dropped front on the Anniversary. The front standard of the Pacemaker can be altered by drilling a new hole for the tilt clamping screw to permit both front and back tilt. The Speed Graphic has been the subject of countless such modifications to give it more of the functions of a view camera, but it is still just a mangled press camera.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin